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Charlotte Had Racial Harmony. Then BLM and Nation of Islam Thugs Came

racial harmony no longer in Charlotte

A black leader from the Nation of Islam is calling for an economic boycott of the city of Charlotte. “Since black lives don’t matter in the city, then our black dollars shouldn’t matter,” he said:

Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke responded, saying the fact that Keith L. Scott wielded a gun when police approached him, and that he was shot by a black officer, was purposely left out of the story by the liberal media “to stoke up anger and resentment”:

Look at what was on display last night. It looked like something that resembled something you see in a third world nation like Haiti. It didn’t represent the good city of Charlotte, North Carolina, here in the United States. You saw a primitive behavior on display at best, and at worse, you saw subhuman behavior as people just reacted to circumstances. Rioting, looting, is not a socially acceptable response to people’s frustration.

As a resident of Charlotte, I agree with Clarke 100 percent.

This does not represent my home, and contrary to the opinions of leaders from the Nation of Islam, black lives do matter in Charlotte -- all lives matter, including the lives of our children, who are now worried about threats to their safety.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools has had to call in counselors to the schools to ease concerns among the students, and the superintendent has had to reassure parents that they are doing everything they can to keep our children safe.

Rioters, agitated by Black Lives Matter and Nation of Islam thugs, have no right to disrupt our community where blacks and whites typically live together in peace.

What many people don’t realize is that these protests didn’t just spring up in response to the shooting of Scott by a black police officer. Last year, the trial of a white police officer ended in a mistrial for shooting an unarmed black man, and he was never retried. The investigation was complicated, but a video showed the young man clearly running toward police officers when they told him to stand down. The police officer shot him in self-defense.

After the trial, a few protestors took to the streets, angry about the outcome. Black Lives Matter was part of that, but the protests fizzled. That’s because Charlotte, for the most part, has been a peaceful community with blacks and whites working side by side for the good of our families and our neighbors.

Clearly, those agitators never left. They pounced on this latest incident to stir up hate. The result has been violence, as they use fear to intimidate peaceful citizens to advance their own race-conscious agenda.

To malign the people of this city with false accusations of racism and injustice is wrong, and merely perpetuates violence. The rioters in Charlotte aren’t concerned about justice.

They’re not protestors -- they’re criminals who are damaging property and injuring people.

As Clarke said, this is not a socially acceptable response to frustrations. The acceptable response is to wait for an investigation to be completed, for the facts to come to light, and then for steps within the law to be taken to remedy any violations of justice. There is no reason to rip a peaceful community apart, to disrupt its economy and hurt hardworking citizens -- both black and white -- who want to care for their families, or to scare children whose only concern should be their school work.

To cause this disruption is the real injustice here, and as a proud Charlotte citizen, I won’t allow the lies to go unchallenged, and neither should anyone who cares about justice and the lives of all people no matter the color of their skin.