But Of Course, Record Antarctic Ice Is a Sign of Global Warming Too

Just makin' stuff up.

Scientists have recently learned and reported that the near record-high sea ice levels near Antarctica don’t mean that global warming is not a factor at play. In fact, scientists believe the opposite is true.

Last month, on September 20th the ice level peaked at 7.78 million square miles. The 2014 level shattered the previous record which was set just a year ago in 2013. While scientists are not sure what the exact meaning behind the record levels, they do know a few other things.

Follow what was said there: "scientists believe", and "not sure what the exact meaning" is but, hey, CONSENSUS, right?

Here is the-ahem-logic that follows from all of that believing and not knowing:

The largest takeaway from the research and the remarks were made that the best answer scientists have right now is simply that the North and South poles are the most extreme places on earth. Furthermore, they are the most extreme differences on earth. Any issues, any changes, any climate anomalies, will be felt in the greatest proportion there, rather than in the middle of the earth where the extremes are less noticeable.

See Also: Sharks show personality traits just like humans, study says

Much of this comes back to the logic that many have tried to convey for some time. Global warming isn’t a matter of extremes, or a matter of swift – and well-defined changes to our overall climate. Instead, climate change – or global warming – is the middle, or the average – changing.

In essence, change the average of the planet – and you’ve effectively changed the entire planet – no matter how the extremes on the northern or southern ends behave.

In summation: we should worry about the average between literal polar opposites that are experiencing (per this article) opposite manifestations of all of this change (what's freezing in Antarctica is melting in the Arctic). If one extreme gets hotter and one gets colder then the average gets...

Don't worry, they'll come up with a Common Core way of changing what "average" means soon.