Brother of Mass Shooting Victim Campaigns Against Gun Control

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Few people on either side of the border realize that school shootings were invented in Canada, not the U.S. -- a good 20 years before Columbine, as a matter of fact.

Canada's worst -- the 1989 killing of 14 female engineering students by evil white man Marc Lepine (Muslim) Gamil Gharbi -- was the impetus behind the nation's utterly pointless long gun registry.

Every year, Canadian liberals and progressives "celebrate" the December 6 anniversary (I call it "Never Hear the End of It" Day), because at least until recently, that registry (like "free" "health" "care") was one of the Canadian things they were most proud of.

Then Harper's Conservatives, as promised, abolished the registry.

A recent Supreme Court decision upheld the government's right to destroy all its data.

(Another moot point: Thanks to the ingenious Great Canadian Gun Registry Shuffle, those records were rendered useless anyhow.)

Here and in the U.S., we gun-rights types are used to being scolded with the phrase, "You'd change your mind if one of your relatives got shot."

Well, meet Claude Colgan.

His sister was killed during the "Montreal Massacre," and he is an outspoken opponent of gun control laws that merely punish the law abiding while doing nothing to reduce crime.

Here he is talking to Brian Lilley of TheRebel.media following the Supreme Court decision: