Biden Gets His Presidential Dreams Stomped by Clinton in New Poll


Vice President Joe Biden got his dreams of succeeding his boss in the Oval Office pretty squashed this week -- in a historical way.

“In my heart, I’m confident I could make a good president,” Biden told the Today show in his flurry of post-State of the Union interviews, stressing "I haven't made a decision to run and I haven't made a decision not to run."

Then came a Washington Post-ABC News poll that shows Clinton with the biggest primary polling lead of a presidential front-runner in a non-incumbent year -- ever.

Clinton trounced Biden in the survey of Democrats with 73 percent to the veep's 12 percent. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), who has not said that she wants to run, got 8 percent.

The GOP field, a question asked of Republican respondents, was predictably all over the map.

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (D-Wis.) had 20 percent support, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush pulled in 18 percent, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie registered at 13 percent, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) got 12 percent, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) was at his heels with 11 percent, and Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) rounded out the pack at 10 percent.

In a head-to-head matchup between Clinton and Christie, Clinton pulled in 53 percent support to 41 percent for the governor. Sixteen percent of those identifying as Republicans picked Clinton, while eight percent of those identifying as Democrats picked Christie.

Clinton's favorability rating is at 58 percent, while Christie is at 35 percent with a quarter of those surveyed holding no opinion of the governor one way or the other.

For a party that capitalized on President Obama's youth to twice win the White House, 2016 is shaping up to be an older race, as Biden is currently 71 and Clinton is 66. Warren, if she decided to jump into the race, is 64; Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who has expressed interest in running to make a point about far-left policies, is 72.