Asia Tells Obama to Take a Hike on His Energy Schemes

Energy prices are rising for Americans because Barack Obama wants it that way. He told the San Francisco Chronicle that he would use energy prices hikes to socially engineer energy use, and that is one promise on which he is following through. His EPA's war on coal alone stands to jack up power prices 70 to 80 percent, according to Dr. Julio Friedmann, of the US Department of Energy.

In recent remarks to the League of Conservation Voters, Obama said that he expects the rest of the world, including developing countries and the largest economies, to do what he is doing to their own energy consumers.

"[W]e’ve got to lead by example.  They’re waiting to see what America does." Obama said on June 25. "And I’m convinced when America proves what’s possible, other countries are going to come along."

About that.

Asia's two largest economies are not waiting to see what America does, and they're showing no sign of following Obama's anti-coal lead.

China says it shares Obama's goal, but it is following its own lead.

China's chief climate official Xie Zhenhua said China should not be subject to the same rules for greenhouse gas emissions as the United States and other rich countries, signaling that Beijing will oppose any attempt to impose them at next year's world climate conference.

"We are in different development stages, we have different historical responsibilities and we have different capacities," Xie told reporters.

Japan is not only not following Obama's war on coal, it is increasing coal use in new domestic energy projects, according to Mari Iwata in the Wall Street Journal today.

Japan said Wednesday it would step up support for coal-fired power plants in developing nations, challenging a U.S. policy that seeks to discourage such plants in an effort to fight global warming. […] The move represents a repudiation of the Obama administration's strict stance of carbon emissions. Washington is talking to members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a club of developed nations, about a rule that would ban national export-credit agencies from financing new overseas coal power plants.

Japan understands that coal can safely power its economy.

Under Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's growth strategy, Tokyo seeks each year to back overseas coal power-plant projects worth about $4 billion. Typically those projects have Japanese investors and use at least some Japanese equipment. While the annual target hasn't been reached yet, several major projects have recently gotten under way.

Japan has long supported energy efficiency. Unlike Barack Obama, who claims to support an "all-of-the-above" strategy that in reality only supports the development of expensive so-called "clean" or "green" energy, Japan actually does support all-of-the-above.

China and Japan are the world's second and third largest economies respectively.

They're not buying the Luddite, anti-energy radicalism that Barack Obama is selling on energy.