Ann Coulter's Condition Downgraded to 'Heartless and Cruel'

Ann Coulter used her national megaphone to trash Dr. Kent Brantly Wednesday. Brantly is the American doctor who traveled to Liberia to use his medical skills and training to serve the poor there. He and Nancy Writebol served patients who have Ebola, and have now come down with the deadly virus themselves.

Coulter can be a genius one day and a fool the next. In this column, she takes the latter route.



Coulter's basic argument is that Dr. Brantly should have stayed home and served in Texas instead of Africa, because it's safer to serve here.

That's not necessarily true on the border. But missionary service isn't always about doing the safe thing. It's about being obedient to God. Being obedient to God is often the riskiest thing a Christian can possibly do.

Coulter accuses Dr. Brantly of "Christian narcissism."

Right there in Texas, near where Dr. Brantly left his wife and children to fly to Liberia and get Ebola, is one of the poorest counties in the nation, Zavala County -- where he wouldn't have risked making his wife a widow and his children fatherless.

But serving the needy in some deadbeat town in Texas wouldn't have been "heroic." We wouldn't hear all the superlatives about Dr. Brantly's "unusual drive to help the less fortunate" or his membership in the "Gold Humanism Honor Society." Leaving his family behind in Texas to help the poor 6,000 miles away -- that's the ticket.

Today's Christians are aces at sacrifice, amazing at serving others, but strangely timid for people who have been given eternal life. They need to buck up, serve their own country, and remind themselves every day of Christ's words: "If the world hates you, know that it has hated me before it hated you."

There may be no reason for panic about the Ebola doctor, but there is reason for annoyance at Christian narcissism.

Coulter's column makes me wonder whether she really believes in God or not, or if her God is actually a country and not a supreme being. That would be idolatry, of course.

The Christian missionary call crosses borders, and is as old as Christianity itself. It's Christianity 101.