The Whole Idea of Noah is Wrong

Now all three of these guys are friends of mine, true men of faith, and big brains — and Nolte'll let the air out of your tires if you even look at him sideways — but I have to admit, without having seen the film, without being able to judge of its quality, it's Shapiro's point that sticks with me.  If, as I say, Aronofsky is a declared atheist, if he intended to deliver "the least biblical film ever made," I can't help but wonder: why make a biblical film at all?  No? I mean, the Bible is the sacred book of gazillions of people. If you disagree with it, if you have a different message than, you know, God's, well, fine, but then why not make up your own story, why twist and gut and dishonor this one?

It can't be because Aronofsky is a radically courageous teller of truths. Attacking the Bible doesn't require any courage in America and certainly no radicalism. Read those comments above. Is Shapiro going to hunt Aronofsky down and behead him? Sure, Nolte might (the man's a savage), but he'll probably think better of it in the end. And hell, Moeller's practically inviting the guy to tea.

What do you think the reactions would have been if Aronofsky's film had been called "Mohammed?" If Aronofsky had said, "This is going to be the least Koranic movie ever made?" Do you think the reactions would be so civilized, so thoughtful, so interested in "facilitating important conversations." Now there's a film that would take courage. There's a film that would be radical. And there's a film that Aronofsky is never going to make!

The idea of using the Bible to make a non-biblical film just seems wrong in and of itself — mean and small-hearted and bullying, and cowardly too when you consider he could've taken on the Koran. Regardless of the movie's quality, it just seems like the wrong thing to do per se. Unneighborly you might call it. UnChristian.

But then, maybe that's the whole problem.