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Is Occupy Oakland as Bad as They Say?

October 24th, 2011 - 2:58 am

Bonus Pictures

For dessert, here are a few bonus pictures to round out your Occupy Oakland experience:


As bloggers have noticed at various Occupies around the country, over the last two weeks Robin Hood has emerged as the movement’s latest hero-du-jour.


And don’t forget about the precious bodily fluids!


It’s almost refreshing to see some home-grown Marxism for once, instead of these slick operations with their own printing presses and design departments.


The upside-down flag says “Indian land.” Funny, though, that none of the non-Native American protesters seem to be making any plans to de-colonialize themselves back to wherever their ancestors came from. Note also the fashionable jacket. Occupy chic will be in Old Navy next year, I guarantee it.


No post-9/11 protest is considered to have a minyan until at least one Truther shows up.


Even the nihilists had their views represented — or in this case kinda Marx-o-nihilists.


The Che quote, the coolie hat — now that‘s dedication.


You don’t need to be fluent in Spanish to translate this sign.


The divisions and subdivisions in the identity politics movement have gotten so specific that you can no longer refer to minorities as simply “people of color,” because the gay minorities might then feel left out, as one of the minority identifiers (color) subsumes what might possibly be a more important minority identifier (queer); but on the other hand, you can’t refer to all minorities as “queer people of color,” because some of them might not in fact be queer. Solution? The proper term for minorities is now the all-inclusive-but-not-presumptuous “POC/QPOC” — People of Color/Queer People of Color. Do not forget this, as it will be on your next revolutionary test.


To this day, I still can’t tell if some of these people take themselves seriously or not.


Here’s the official eviction notice, to be complete.

So: Is Occupy Oakland as bad as they say it is?

You saw the pictures; you decide.

UPDATE:

Late in the day on Monday, October 24, the Occupiers sent out emergency press releases saying that they were tipped off that the police would follow through on their eviction orders in the upcoming hours:

OAKLAND, CA [October 24, 2011]–
An Oakland city official has tipped off the Occupy Oakland protest group that a raid tonight is “highly probable.” Such a raid would happen after midnight, and would most likely occur between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m.

Oakland officials have delivered notice to the protesters at Frank Ogawa Plaza and at Snow Park that the protesters are no longer allowed to stay overnight in the public parks. Today’s announcement comes on the same day as Occupy Oakland’s two-week birthday party, with cake and celebration planned for 5 p.m. tonight at the corner of Broadway and 14th.

“Our goal is to facilitate individuals to remove their tents, cooking facilities, and belongings, and to leave cooperatively,” wrote city administrator Deanna Santana in an update to Oakland city staff earlier today. “We do not anticipate that our efforts to facilitate the departure of overnight protesters will disrupt your work or require changes to your work schedule.”

The Occupy Oakland group has established significant infrastructure in the past 14 days. An occupation-run kitchen feeds the more than 400 protesters staying in the two parks, while workshops and organizational meetings happen throughout each day. A children’s village is available for parents and their kids, and a number of structures are in place to serve the full occupation, including a library, a school and a first-aid center.

Shortly after 5 p.m., the Oakland fire marshal confiscated the Occupy Oakland camp’s propane and cooking supplies. All ability to cook food is now cut off, after a solid two weeks of meal preparation for the full camp. This follows an Oakland city official’s tip to the Occupy Oakland protest group that a raid tonight is “highly probable.” A full camp-wide raid would happen after midnight, and would most likely occur between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. Protesters have put an emergency notification system in place; to sign up for text alerts in the event of a police raid, text “bayaction” to 41411.

UPDATE:

The party is over:

Police clear Occupy Oakland camps, arrest dozens

Oakland police arrested dozens of people at a plaza outside City Hall and at a second, smaller camp nearby early this morning, two weeks after the protesters launched efforts as part of the nationwide Occupy Wall Street movement against corporate greed and economic inequality.

City officials said they had been forced to clear the encampments because of sanitary and public safety concerns.

At about 4:57 a.m., officers began making arrests and removing tents and makeshift shelters at the Occupy Oakland protest at Frank Ogawa Plaza near 14th Street and Broadway. By 5:05 a.m., the bulk of the arrests had been completed, and arrestees were led away in plastic handcuffs.

Officials initially waived city laws that ban camping and allowed the occupation of the plaza. But since Thursday, the city has issued of series of orders for protesters to vacate the area, citing concerns about fire hazards, sanitation issues, graffiti, drug use and violence.

Officials said protesters had plugged power cords into city utility poles and had denied access to emergency responders who needed to get into the plaza. The city was also alarmed by the activists’ decision to try to police themselves with a volunteer security team.

UPDATE:

And here is the conclusion — video of the camp being dismantled by the police this morning:

UPDATE:

And don’t miss what happened the following night:

Rioting in Downtown Oakland as Occupiers Clash with Police

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