Get PJ Media on your Apple

VodkaPundit

The Post-PC World

March 5th, 2014 - 1:51 pm

You won’t get the desktop out from under my desk until you pry it from my desk’s cold, dead hands, but:

Worldwide personal-computer shipments may decline by a steeper-than-forecast 6.1 percent this year as demand weakens in emerging markets, researcher IDC said.

PC unit sales are projected to fall for a third straight year to 295.9 million from 315.1 million in 2013, IDC said today in a statement. The researcher, which in January predicted a 3.8 percent drop in 2014 and growth of less than 1 percent in 2015, now estimates the declines will persist through 2018.

On a second reading though, I have to wonder how much of that emerging market weakness is due to increased use of tablets and smartphones, and how much of the weakness might be due to emerging markets’ increasing weakness.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (8)
All Comments   (8)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
Here is the big thing. The PC market is entirely controlled by Windows and no one likes Windows. Microsoft for a number of long standing institutional reasons, isn't remotely afraid of loosing it's customers. Xbox One shows that.

But it also shows that Microsoft is now vulnerable. I would honestly say it's as vulnerable as IBM was in 1980.

I've been playing with Steam OS and no, it won't beat Windows.

At the this moment.

It does however have real potential as a potential usurper for the Windows crown. Not least because Valve has no real risk when you look at it.

Hardware investment: $0.0
Steambox is all standard hardware. Nothing proprietary needed or apparently wanted.

Software investment: $who the he11 knows
But since it's based on Linux so you can assume it wasn't a bank breaker.

From Valves history as a company they appear to betting on an Army of Davids, crowd sourced OS. If it was any other company I would be laughing my a$$ off. But this is Valve so I'm not.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
I run WIn 7 on a 4 or 5 year old Dell box, using it for media applications. I have a couple of 9 year old Asus boxes that I use for servers. They run Scientific Linux 6.5 just fine. My Gateway laptop is also running SL 6.5, and I can run Oracle VirtualBox w/ Win 7 (or anything else) if I need Windows where I am. (It ran a pre-release version of Win 8.1 just fine, too.) As much as I'd like a new laptop, the one I have does just fine, as do the older Asus boxen. I can't make a 'business case' to myself to upgrade hardware - I see that as a luxury, not a necessity.

Bottom line, whilst I *love* bleeding edge stuff, I don't really need it to do what I want to do. I suspect that's true of a lot of users!
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
I like Asus boxes. They make great motherboards, and while this little puppy isn't much of a gamer, he's great with audio & video. You can't even hear the CPU fan running. The only thing I wish it had was USB 3.0. Prolly get a card with that soon.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
I stopped using a desktop machine for the daily grind once the TiBook came out. Suddenly there was a laptop with a usable keyboard, that was light and thin enough to tote about without thinking, and with a good enough screen to get my daily work done. Personally, a laptop is as small as it gets for my workflow-- can't do 3/4s of it efficiently on a tablet.

Only thing I use them for now is horsepower-- video editing and compression, multitrack audio, graphic design.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
Mr. Lion, my problem (and it is my problem {g}) is that my idea of a perfect keyboard is the old Model M, which isn't made any more. I don't recall the name of the company which bought the tech from Lexmark, but they're in Kentucky, and you can get a modern equivalent for about $60+. Don't know if they're as good as the older models.

I generally dislike all laptop-style keyboards because they have such little travel in the keys. Alas many desktop keyboards are now being built in the same manner. I don't use the keyboard which came with my Asus for exactly that reason.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
Less travel = faster. Do a typing speed test on a clacktronic with half an inch of key throw, then do one on a new Mac board. I'm 30 wpm faster, with higher accuracy, and my wrists don't hurt after writing a few bajillion lines of code.

Mostly it's about the speed. Typing done sooner = more time for girls and booze. Girls and booze are better than computers.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'm not sure people are using PCs less - I have a smartphone, tablet etc but still use my PC where possible for the benefits of the mouse, keyboard, big screen etc. I think PCs are simply not being replaced as frequently as they used to be. Up to 2005 people had to replace their PCs every 3-4 years simply to be able to run the latest software and operating systems, but that has stopped, or at least slowed significantly. A 2007 vintage dual core PC of the sort I'm using now will still run the latest versions of Windows and MS office, and I can even play all but the most advanced games on it, so why replace it?
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
The answer is "yes." I've said it before: tablets & smart phones are more effective in many cases than a desktop; email is one good example. Didn't you post something a few months back where most email is sent/received via mobile devices now?

I'll make a prediction: we will see most folks upgrade their mobile devices more frequently than their desktops, assuming they have a desktop. Phones are especially inexpensive to upgrade if you own a plan. Or do providers still offer that path these days?

Either way it's likely cheaper than buying even a low-end $400 Best Buy desktop.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
View All