Get PJ Media on your Apple

VodkaPundit

Manning Will Face “Aiding the Enemy” Charges

July 19th, 2013 - 11:02 am

Because treason is so narrowly defined by the Constitution — and rightly so — I think we should see more trials like this:

The judge presiding over the court martial of the WikiLeaks source Bradley Manning has declined to throw out the main charge against him – that he knowingly “aided the enemy” by leaking state secrets that were posted on the internet.

The decision by Colonel Denise Lind, who is sitting as judge and jury over the army private in a courtroom at Fort Meade, Maryland, means that Manning continues to face the possibility of life in military custody with no chance of parole. The “aiding the enemy” charge is one of the most severe offences available to military prosecutors, and has lead to the accusation that the Obama administration is attempting to put a chill on whistleblowers that could have far-reaching consequences for investigative journalism.

This isn’t about investigative journalism. Manning revealed operational intelligence that certainly helped the enemy. And likely got Americans killed on overseas battlefields. That’s a BFD, and deserved to be punished with the full weight of the law.

Which brings us to Edward Snowden.

Snowden revealed a program, not operational intelligence, for domestic spying. That’s something Americans deserve to know about, so that we might punish (or reward, if that’s your thing) the elected officials who did this to us.

I’m not saying Snowden deserves a medal, but he provided aid — and discomfort — to the American people.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (7)
All Comments   (7)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
Hi Stephen,
I'm a retired Navy Officer and have sat on a couple Courts Martial, plus l conducted one Summary Courts Martial, which was a very strange experience.

FYI, the JAG presiding officer is *NOT* 'judge and jury,' in point of fact the members of the Courts Martial decide facts, verdict and punishment (if any). The presiding officer manages the trial, and provides legal guidance to the member of the Courts Martial.

Best Regards,
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Uh, WHAT enemy ?? I don't seem to recall a war being declared. Or does "enemy" now mean "anyone we don't like" ????
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Congress has authorized force -- war -- in Afghanistan, Iraq, and more generally against terrorists.

So don't be an idiot on purpose.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
One OTHER point: Manning released the docs to WikiLeaks. NOT the Taliban. Not Iran. Wikileaks then released the docs to the world.

So. . . .from a legal standpoint: transitive guilt ?? Not to get picky, but that's like busting you for drugs because one of the 20's in your wallet shows traces of cocaine. . .
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Authorization of the use of force and a Declaration of War are legally QUITE different. If war has not been declared, then, at least legally, we don't have an enemy. This has been discussed quite a bit in Law of War classes in the military: Hostile Combatant is not legally equivalent to Enemy Combatant, different rules apply, Steve. . .

Now, in general, the US applies the Geneva Conventions on the Conduct of War to situations that are not, legally, wars. But we are not REQUIRED to do so unless a formal Declaration of War has passed the Senate. . .
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Whatever the personality problems of Edward Snowden, he performed a public service.

But Bradley Manning? His act was a betrayal. How harshly he deserves to be punished depends on whether anybody died forwhat he did, but I see no way to spin it positively.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
What's the big deal with Snowden? All he released was metadata.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
View All