For the Obamacare scandal, we are asked to believe:

1. The Obama administration consistently published up-to-date and accurate information about the number of ongoing enrollees and those who have paid their premiums.

2. The president’s promises that Americans could keep their health plans and doctors were misinterpreted; in fact, he referred only to those who had existing legitimate health plans, not substandard ones that of course were in need of government intervention and substitution.

3. Kathleen Sebelius and the president met frequently over the Affordable Care Act rollout and foresaw many of the problems beforehand.

4. The collapse of the website and general chaos upon implementation are the normal sorts of problems that accompany ambitious new government programs.

5. Because of Republican rejectionism, it became necessary for the president to delay a few of the provisions of the ACA in order to protect the interests of the formerly uninsured.

6. Most of the problems with the ACA have resulted from Republican obstructionism and nihilism that sought to deny the poor and needy access to health care.

7. The few million who lost their health care plans eventually will come to appreciate the president’s leadership, once they discover that they now have more comprehensive ACA coverage at cheaper costs.

8. Stories of patient, doctor and insurance chaos are largely partisan narratives promulgated by those who always opposed the ACA.

9. There is still a good chance, as Republican stonewalling wanes, that the ACA will lower insurance premiums and increase small-business competitiveness as originally promised. Likewise the ACA will help lower the deficit as promised.

10. That a large number of the new ACA enrollees simply switched over from Medicaid programs is either untrue or irrelevant.

11. The ACA will not fundamentally affect levels of Medicare coverage.

For the VA mess, the Obama administration would have us believe:

1. The mess, to the extent that it was a mess, was largely a result of prior policies of the Bush administration as Barack Obama pointed out as early as 2008.

2. The Bush wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were largely responsible for the delays in service, as hundreds of thousands of new vets were dumped into the system.

3. The problem at the VA was not necessarily the fault of Gen. Shinseki, an iconic figure who bravely opposed the Iraq war and a public servant who has largely been demonized by those seeking partisan advantage.

4. The VA scandal, such as it is, highlights why President Obama overhauled the health care system and gave us the ACA.

5. The VA scandal is mostly, like the IRS brouhaha, a regional matter with no national implications.