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Works and Days

Count Me Out on Syria

May 13th, 2013 - 9:44 am

Most Who Called for Removal of Saddam Eventually Turned on Bush

Here is my point. Most of those who called for preemption between 1998 and 2001 eventually turned on Mr. Bush, who had listened to them. Almost all the liberal and conservative pundits of the New York Times and Washington Post who wanted intervention eventually bailed with the suspect excuse of something like “my three-week brilliant take-down, your stupid five-year occupation.” Some claimed missing WMD gave them an out (as if we suddenly also learned that Saddam had not posted rewards for suicide bombers, murdered thousands, tried to kill a U.S. president, harbored terrorists, broke UN resolutions, gassed his own people, etc.).

Those who once sung Bush’s praises the loudest and urged him onward (give him the Nobel Prize, nuke Saddam, “I wrote the Axis of Evil line,” sweep the Middle East) were always the most clever of critics, as if the more Hillary screamed or Harry Reid declared the surge lost, the more we would forget their October 2002 calls to arms.

If in 2002 Iraq was to be a “cakewalk,” by 2004 it was “Bush’s war.” To name just a few across the political spectrum in random order, I’m sure that a Francis Fukuyama, Fareed Zakaria, Andrew Sullivan, George Will, the late William F. Buckley, Jr., Thomas Friedman, John Kerry, and thousands of others all had legitimate reasons in abandoning the cause of Iraq. Lord knows it was unwise to let thousands of scattered Ba’athist soldiers roam the streets of Iraq unemployed. How stupid was it to focus only on WMD when the Congress gave lots of reasons to remove Saddam? More tragic still was pulling out of Fallujah in April 2004 only to have to retake it in November. Why was a junior three-star mediocrity like Ricardo Sanchez put in charge of ground troops in Iraq? Why did Tommy Franks just quit almost at the moment the three-week war stopped and the reckoning started? “Bring ‘em on” and “Mission Accomplished” are speaking loudly while carrying small sticks. The list of screw-ups goes on and on. But the fact remains that victory in war goes not to those who make no mistakes, but to those who learn the most quickly from them in order to ensure the fewest in the future.

I also grant that one can change one’s mind. But here is the point, to paraphrase Matthew Ridgway of the mess he inherited in Korea: the only worse thing for a great power with global responsibilities than fighting a poorly conducted war is losing one.  I know too the age-old nostrums — that was then, this is now, things change, only with self-reflection comes wisdom, change is sometimes necessary, etc., etc.

But I have also lost all trust in the Democratic Senate, the commentariat, and the media to call for any U.S. intervention in the Middle East, given that there is a chance that it will go badly, the zealots will bail, and the soldiers alone will be stuck on the battlefield in a Middle East miasma, with little support at home — a Michael Moore lauding the enemy as “Minutemen,” a MoveOn.Org labeling Petraeus “General Betray Us,” an Alfred Knopf published novel imagining the assassination of a U.S. president, a prominent conservative confessing how he was “duped” by the “neo-cons,” and on and on. Again, been there, done that, sick of it.

One day drones and Guantanamo are war crimes originating from Afghanistan and Iraq, the next day they are … what, exactly? One day in 2004 Barack Obama has no problem with current U.S. policy in Iraq (“There’s not that much difference between my position and George Bush’s position at this stage”); one day in 2007 he wants all U.S. combat troops out by March 2008? In short, there is no evidence that either those in this administration or our elites in general are up for another bloody slog in the Middle East.

I also have only little sympathy now for “Arab reformers,” especially those ensconced at U.S. and European universities. Yes, Iraq was a mess. Bush was a twangy Texan, we know. I am sorry that we do not have mellifluous Martin Luther Kings or Abraham Lincolns around to send in F-16s. The fact remains that Bush was also an idealist, naïve maybe, but not an imperialist or colonialist. He was someone who really believed in establishing the chance of freedom in the Middle East, in the manner that he sought to provide cheap AIDS medication for Africa or expand Medicare prescription drugs, whether all on borrowed money or not. Hate him if you must for being a naïf, but not a British imperialist or Nixonian strategist.

Comments are closed.

Top Rated Comments   
Yes. 9/11 ripped the lid off the bitter social divide that was percolating under the surface. I too supported the removal of Sadaam, but did not anticipate the viciousness of the Leftist attack as they, Vietnam-like, used the war (and the deaths of heroic Americans) to fuel their attack on the Constitution. This was a calculated and vicious betrayal, and its nature tells you everything you need to know about what kind of people are driving this neo-communist / globalist putsch.

I supported the war in Iraq because what I saw looming was a generational war with a re-emerging worldview that was hostile to our existence: Jihadism, or Islam in its militant form. Like most religions, Islam has peaceful as well as war-like aspects, and whichever aspect is predominant depends on a variety of factors. As opposed to Christianity, Islam's peaceful aspect is fragile and thin, while it's warlike aspect is large and emphatic.

Historically, Islam was either in united, expansionist mode, or in divided, impotent mode. When it's the former, neighbors would shudder, when in the latter there was nothing to worry about. Now, in the age of WMD, its a different story. Even in their “dormant” phase, with a single spectacular attack they can turn a super-power on its head.

Many argued that Iraq under Sadaam had nothing to do with Jihad. That was not true, albeit the connections were tenuous, they were there. Here was a belligerent ruler, openly trying to destabilize the entire region, not to mention the petroleum economy. He could and would have wrapped himself in the cloak of Jihad, and employed terrorist methods anytime it seemed expedient. Trying to preempt him, and to break the wider Jihadist pattern by sending a message to other Arab leaders made sense, but as VDH points out, it was poorly executed. A deep enough understanding of the dynamics of the region appears to have been lacking, particularly Iran's willingness to enter the conflict using guerrilla methods. A broader campaign was necessary, and more pain had to be inflicted. It's the hard reality of war with extremist enemies. And again as VDH points out, the worse thing a super-power can do in those circumstances is withdraw. In the tribal equation any sign of weakness, psychological or otherwise, only invites further aggression.

Now we are in the doubly dangerous position of fighting a religious enemy who is de-centralized and can strike from any direction; and who is in league and being supported by elements of our own government. The leftist-globalists seem to be using the US military to re-shape the political landscape in the middle-east, even going so far as supporting the Muslim Brotherhood and even Al-Qaeda to do so. If this were a movie, I'd shake my head and say it was too far-fetched to be believable. But unfortunately its not.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Agreed - there is no such thing as moderate islam - there is only islam.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
There is no strategic reason to expose one US soldier to death in Syria. If Al Queda gets Assad's gas supplies and uses them, that's a casus belie and we can pound them and their allies later. We need to stop being the world's damn policeman. We have no allies in Syria, only enemies who are unworthy of our aid.
The US should arm Israel to the teeth, tell the Egyptians it was nice while it lasted, and tell the rest of the Arab nations they are on their own. Let them fight among themselves Sunni vs Shia. Not another American penny to any Arab-Islam nation. We get nothing but trouble from the Arab countries, we'd be much better off with very limited contact.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (51)
All Comments   (51)
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We haven't really had a successful intervention since Korea and that was a stalemate. Enough, particularly in the Islamic world. Persian Gulf oil is no longer a major factor, let these people fight it out and solve their own problems.
47 weeks ago
47 weeks ago Link To Comment
Peace in the Middle East = depopulated Middle East. It's just that simple.

Islam, can't trust it.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
a MoveOn.Org labeling Petraeus “General Betray Us,”

And a sitting Senator, future Secretary of State calling belief in the veracity of Petraeus' Iraq progress report required "A willing suspension of disbelief..." or, in shorter words, a lie.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
I wouldn't trust any theater of war...to theater majors.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well written and correct, as usual. I can simplify it into a single sentence: What is our national interest in Syria? Before anyone says "Peace in the Middle East", taming the animals in Syria won't do it. Neither will it work in Libya or any of these other pitiful excuses for a nation. We should support Israel and wash our hands of the rest of this filth: The Jews are well capable of dealing with the Arabs when that becomes necessary. Not one more drop of US blood should be wasted on this part of the world.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Made-Ron Paul by the force of history. It was an eventuality. Glad it happened.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Great arguement, Professor. It sure would be great if we gave the Syrian conflict as good of a leaving alone as we have given the conflicts in Mali, Somalia, Rwanda etc.

Unfortunately for America, it seems, if the rumors are true, that we are already involved with arming the opposition in Syria.

And one more thing, also in the rumor mill, is that I have read that Russia has been pushing for peace talks on Syria, but our media refuses to report on that but only portrays Russia as a warmonger on the "wrong" side in the conflict. (As if there were a "correct" side!)

This rumor, whether true or not, raises the question that we never hear open calls from the US Administration for peace talks among the parties in Syria..

Why is that?
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Greetings:

I tend to view Islam as a globalization of 7th Century Arab tribal culture under the guise of religion. It has made little progress since and the people on whom it has been inflicted show little ability to challenge or change it.

Islam is the millstone. If your plan doesn't include constraining, undermining, or eradicating Islam, you don't have a plan. What you have is a hope.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Mo's dicta really date from the Neolithic age -- 12,000 ybp compared to 1,200 ybp.

He was completely retro by even Eighth Century standards -- being unable to restrain his feral brigandry -- breaking all taboos.

Pashtunwali -- the way of the Pashtun is PURE Neolithic thinking. The ISAF runs into it all the time.

Thinking that ONLY 12 centuries separates our norms causes no end of troubles.

The Jews and Arab polytheist-pagans of his time were thousands of years more morally advanced than Mo.' That has to be acknowledged -- and broadcast.

Mo' was a sociopath, a scoundrel by even ancient standards. At one time or another, he committed every crime known.




48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Dr. Hanson, I agree with everything you said. The blood of our young people is too precious to waste on peoples whose very desire is to kill and they don't care who. Let them kill each other.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Not just let, HELP them kill each other.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
"The history of the Middle East in particular (see Iran in 1980) and world history in general (cf. France, 1794 or Russia, 1917) suggests that the more extreme, better organized revolutionary zealots, even when in the minority, usually win out over the moderate and sensible reformers in the post-war sorting out and sizing up."

Dr. Hanson

I couldn't agree more as I witness an extreme minority driving our own country into the ground. A bitter warning for what awaits us if we continue down our current path. Ours is not a (yet or perhaps ever) an armed war but is in fact a cultural, class, race, gender, political war but nonetheless a war that will culminate in our eventual death by suicide and hopefully a decent resurrection when we are forced to return to the roots of family, spirit and the soul, local government, small government, free markets and the hands on individual freedoms that made this country great.

No guarantees I realize, but it would seem that we need to collapse before the average person gets it.

Then again maybe there really is a Marxist Utopia and I'm all wet. In that event "All Hail the Collective".
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yes. 9/11 ripped the lid off the bitter social divide that was percolating under the surface. I too supported the removal of Sadaam, but did not anticipate the viciousness of the Leftist attack as they, Vietnam-like, used the war (and the deaths of heroic Americans) to fuel their attack on the Constitution. This was a calculated and vicious betrayal, and its nature tells you everything you need to know about what kind of people are driving this neo-communist / globalist putsch.

I supported the war in Iraq because what I saw looming was a generational war with a re-emerging worldview that was hostile to our existence: Jihadism, or Islam in its militant form. Like most religions, Islam has peaceful as well as war-like aspects, and whichever aspect is predominant depends on a variety of factors. As opposed to Christianity, Islam's peaceful aspect is fragile and thin, while it's warlike aspect is large and emphatic.

Historically, Islam was either in united, expansionist mode, or in divided, impotent mode. When it's the former, neighbors would shudder, when in the latter there was nothing to worry about. Now, in the age of WMD, its a different story. Even in their “dormant” phase, with a single spectacular attack they can turn a super-power on its head.

Many argued that Iraq under Sadaam had nothing to do with Jihad. That was not true, albeit the connections were tenuous, they were there. Here was a belligerent ruler, openly trying to destabilize the entire region, not to mention the petroleum economy. He could and would have wrapped himself in the cloak of Jihad, and employed terrorist methods anytime it seemed expedient. Trying to preempt him, and to break the wider Jihadist pattern by sending a message to other Arab leaders made sense, but as VDH points out, it was poorly executed. A deep enough understanding of the dynamics of the region appears to have been lacking, particularly Iran's willingness to enter the conflict using guerrilla methods. A broader campaign was necessary, and more pain had to be inflicted. It's the hard reality of war with extremist enemies. And again as VDH points out, the worse thing a super-power can do in those circumstances is withdraw. In the tribal equation any sign of weakness, psychological or otherwise, only invites further aggression.

Now we are in the doubly dangerous position of fighting a religious enemy who is de-centralized and can strike from any direction; and who is in league and being supported by elements of our own government. The leftist-globalists seem to be using the US military to re-shape the political landscape in the middle-east, even going so far as supporting the Muslim Brotherhood and even Al-Qaeda to do so. If this were a movie, I'd shake my head and say it was too far-fetched to be believable. But unfortunately its not.
48 weeks ago
48 weeks ago Link To Comment
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