It’s been asked before but the question bears repeating: Could the IRS survive an audit by the IRS?

Like a lot of big companies, the Internal Revenue Service allows some of its 90,000 employees to use company charge cards to buy work-related items, such as office supplies.

The IRS isn’t a “company.”

The inspector general said the IRS has been negligent when it comes to catching employees who circumvent $3,000 caps on transactions, by splitting purchases into several transactions. The agency also doesn’t have a good record at turning off credit cards as soon as employees depart or retire.

“The IRS purchase card program lacks consistent oversight to identify and address inappropriate use,” the report found.

The IRS spent $50,000 on a week’s worth of meals, parties and meetings for a five-day International Executive Conference, the report said. During that week, IRS paid for a dinner, which averaged $140 a person.

The IRS also hosted a lunch that averaged $100 a person and included 28 bottles of wine for 41 guests. The IRS defended the purchases by saying that alcohol purchases are allowed by law when entertaining foreign officials, as happened at the conference. But the watchdog said the expenses were too high.

The report also said that employees had spent some $4,000 on buying kazoos, Thomas the Tank Engine rubber wristbands and Nerf footballs.

According to CNN’s story, a couple of IRS cards were used to buy porn, and when the cardholders were questioned they claimed that the cards had been stolen.

The Ron Paul folks could get a lot of mileage if they switched from yelling “Audit the Fed!” to “Audit the IRS!” I bet near 100% of Americans would support that.