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Bridget Johnson

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June 10, 2013 - 7:41 am

Campaign finance records show that the professed leaker of information about the National Security Agency’s surveillance programs likely donated to former Rep. Ron Paul’s (R-Texas) presidential campaign.

Records show a donation from an Edward Snowden in Columbia, Md., a community about eight miles from the NSA at Fort Meade, on March 8, 2012, for $250.

A May 6, 2012, record shows a May 6, 2012, contribution to Paul for $250 from an Edward Snowden in Waipahu, Hawaii. His job is listed as a “senior advisor.”

Booz Allen Hamilton, the contractor which employed Snowden for $200,000 a year, said in a statement yesterday that he hadn’t been with the company for long.

“Booz Allen can confirm that Edward Snowden, 29, has been an employee of our firm for less than 3 months, assigned to a team in Hawaii,” the NSA contractor said in a statement. “News reports that this individual has claimed to have leaked classified information are shocking, and if accurate, this action represents a grave violation of the code of conduct and core values of our firm. We will work closely with our clients and authorities in their investigation of this matter.”

Snowden was a technical assistant for the CIA before working for defense contractors. He told The Guardian that he supported a third-party candidate.

“A lot of people in 2008 voted for Obama. I did not vote for him. I voted for a third party. But I believed in Obama’s promises. I was going to disclose it [but waited because of his election]. He continued with the policies of his predecessor.”

Paul slammed the NSA programs in a post on his website today, calling the leaks “dramatic new evidence of illegal government surveillance of our telephone calls, and of the National Security Agency’s deep penetration into American companies such as Facebook and Microsoft to spy on us.”

“We should know by now that when it comes to government power-grabs, we never go back to the status quo even when the ‘crisis’has passed. That part of our freedom and civil liberties once lost is never regained,” Paul wrote. “…First the government listens in on all of our telephone calls without a warrant and then if it finds something it goes to a FISA court and get an illegal approval for what it has already done! This turns the rule of law and due process on its head.”

“The government does not need to know more about what we are doing. We need to know more about what the government is doing. We need to turn the cameras on the police and on the government, not the other way around. We should be thankful for writers like Glenn Greenwald, who broke last week’s story, for taking risks to let us know what the government is doing. There are calls for the persecution of Greenwald and the other whistle-blowers and reporters. They should be defended, as their work defends our freedom.”

Snowden is holed up in a hotel in Hong Kong, where he says his “primary fear is that they will come after my family, my friends, my partner. Anyone I have a relationship with.”

He and his girlfriend moved out of their home near Honolulu on May 1.

“The NSA has built an infrastructure that allows it to intercept almost everything. With this capability, the vast majority of human communications are automatically ingested without targeting. If I wanted to see your emails or your wife’s phone, all I have to do is use intercepts. I can get your emails, passwords, phone records, credit cards,” he said.

“I don’t want to live in a society that does these sort of things. … I do not want to live in a world where everything I do and say is recorded. That is not something I am willing to support or live under. … We have seen enough criminality on the part of government. It is hypocritical to make this allegation against me. They have narrowed the public sphere of influence.”

He said the crux of the leaks is showing “that the NSA routinely lies in response to congressional inquiries about the scope of surveillance in America.”

“I believe that when [senator Ron] Wyden and [senator Mark] Udall asked about the scale of this, they [the NSA] said it did not have the tools to provide an answer. We do have the tools and I have maps showing where people have been scrutinised most. We collect more digital communications from America than we do from the Russians.”

“We hack everyone everywhere. We like to make a distinction between us and the others. But we are in almost every country in the world. We are not at war with these countries,” Snowden continued. “You are not even aware of what is possible. The extent of their capabilities is horrifying. We can plant bugs in machines. Once you go on the network, I can identify your machine. You will never be safe whatever protections you put in place.”

Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers in 1971, said in a Guardian op-ed today “Snowden’s whistleblowing gives us the possibility to roll back a key part of what has amounted to an ‘executive coup’ against the US constitution.”

“In my estimation, there has not been in American history a more important leak than Edward Snowden’s release of NSA material – and that definitely includes the Pentagon Papers 40 years ago,” Ellsberg wrote. “…Neither the president nor Congress as a whole may by themselves revoke the fourth amendment – and that’s why what Snowden has revealed so far was secret from the American people.”

More: 

John Bolton: Snowden is Guilty of Treason

Bridget Johnson is a veteran journalist whose news articles and opinion columns have run in dozens of news outlets across the globe. Bridget first came to Washington to be online editor at The Hill, where she wrote The World from The Hill column on foreign policy. Previously she was an opinion writer and editorial board member at the Rocky Mountain News and nation/world news columnist at the Los Angeles Daily News. She is an NPR contributor and has contributed to USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, National Review Online, Politico and more, and has myriad television and radio credits as a commentator. Bridget is Washington Editor for PJ Media.

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Top Rated Comments   
someone said it earlier today somewhere. when the info. first became available the thinking was to just see if it could all be collected and deal with the actual info. later. o.k. I can believe that part as being innocent. now we know that the less scrupulous among us (pol's of course) have used it in ways we have never allowed before, w/o asking permission from their bosses, the American people.

gosh, who would have thought our 'most transparent admin. ever' would use it against us? he's right about one thing for sure, as we have been seeing for the past few weeks, this is just the tip of the iceberg.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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All Comments   (16)
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For the record, people might claim that Ron Paul's a libertarian, but I doubt it, especially given how most of his voters are pot smokers and wanted to allow pot. That's closer to liberalism than libertarianism. I know a libertarian, Mr. Pinholster, my Middle School social studies/Georgia History teacher, and he made it clear that he felt drugs were not worth it in some of his witty lectures. Actually, some of Ron Paul's claims were closer to some things George Lucas often espouses, and that guy's so hard left and an outright liberal he even thinks that somehow the Viet Cong are supposed to be good guys. As far as I can tell, Ron Paul's a RINO, and probably more closer to a liberal than a libertarian. So if that leaker was one of Ron Paul's soldiers in his revolution, he's not really that much different than Obama in terms of goals.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
It seems to me that the FBI should really tighten up on who gets that security clearance and that the justice department should make justice harsh and swift for those who divulge secret information. We have always had free speech since the Bill of Rights was enacted but it has become much too free and attorneys drag up al lot of superfluous stuff. P ness is part of the problem.
I am half watching a nutty film called "Deception" and it could be about any of our intelligence agencies.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Test Subject ‘Verax’, the unwitting(?) prey for DHS, NSA, CIA, XYZ?? How good is this PRISM system? Will Snowden be able to Snow dem? Many are pissed, and I love the list of the pissed.

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I found mettacultures comments below the line, with regards to Snowden's Hong Kong maneuver to be of interest, and others might benefit from them.

http://hurryupharry.org/2013/06/10/is-there-a-free-speech-haven-in-chinas-special-administrative-region/


1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Ive been kind of skeptical about this Snowden character. His trusting of Obama, combined with his Ron Paul support, leads one to believe he has bought into quite a bit of Leftwing Anti-Americanism. Now come to find out he is holed up in Red China (where Glenn Greenwald was traveling right after the story broke). His choice of leaking to The Guardian and especially Greenwald (both hardcore Leftwing Anti-American entities) also makes one very wary of this character.

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
SIGNS THAT SNOWDEN IS MORE HERO THAN VILLAIN?

Edward Snowden bravely or stupidly outed himself yesterday June 9, 2013, one day after the 64th anniversary of one of the great publishing events of the 20th century: George Orwell's 1984. A book about a lawless, corrupt, oppressive totalitarian surveillance dystopia. Moreover, the 29 year old Snowden was born in 1984 perhaps a sign that he's fighting genuine injustice and evil. Has Snowden blown the whistle on a gigantic and necessary security apparatus that serves the American people by keeping them safe but has been corrupted by Big Brotherism or Obamunism like the IRS with an out of control administration using the NSA to gather info on political opponents and use it against them? Is this what Snowden saw that so outraged his moral sensibilities and caused him at great personal risk to go public with the secret programs? Not the process of collecting data to find terrorists and foil their plots which is legal and necessary, but the criminal abuse? Is that what he saw? 1984 may be a sign that Snowden is more hero than villian. But we shall see.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Given our government (IRS) is not above harassing American citizens because of their political affiliation, why should I ever trust them to "not read" the information being collected by the NSA?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Many years ago I learned not to trust anyone or anything anyone tells me. I came to this realization as a result of knowing too many lefties but it's been a valuable attitude in all situations. Why would anyone trust any politician? Or any news outlet? Malfeasance, dishonest manipulation and mendacity have been a mainstay in our culture for decades. Trust in God, period.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I think we need to take a closer look at this guy. Admittedly, anyone associated with CIA and NSA is likely to be a bit hard to pin down. But his background sounds...un-spooky. He seems more like someone the CIA would recruit as an informant than as an officer. His big three-month career with BAH doesn't sound very impressive, either.

Do we really know who he is? Or are we just accepting his "revelations" because they're topical?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
This is not a matter of taking Snowden's word; The documents
he released speak for themselves, their authenticity has not been
challenged - to the contrary, the loud pained cries from the Feds
are all the proof one needs.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
as it appears, the O in charge is guilty of possibly treasonous acts against the US, so I'm ok with Snowden getting the same treatment (hide it under the rug), anything more, then our dear O needs to suffer the same fate
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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