So, the New York Times editorial board was mad about Obama’s NSA program yesterday, and said that he has “lost all credibility” concerning transparency and accountability within his administration. They also said that his justifications for overreaching on national security matters are becoming trite.  It was a rather scathing piece from a publication that usually kowtows to this administration.  There was a glimmer of hope that the New York Times would actually hold this administration accountable over the fiasco concerning the NSA’s surveillance program, but that was only for a few hours.

The piece went through some revisions according to NewsDiffs.com, which is a site that tracks updates on articles.  In the end, the Times decided to say that the president had “lost all credibility on this issue.”

Here’s a portion of “credibility” graf in the original piece published at 4:35pm June 7, 2013

 Those reassurances have never been persuasive — whether on secret warrants to scoop up a news agency’s phone records or secret orders to kill an American suspected of terrorism — especially coming from a president who once promised transparency and accountability. The administration has now lost all credibility. Mr. Obama is proving the truism that the executive will use any power it is given and very likely abuse it. That is one reason we have long argued that the Patriot Act, enacted in the heat of fear after the 9/11 attacks by members of Congress who mostly had not even read it, was reckless in its assignment of unnecessary and overbroad surveillance powers.

Here’s the revised version finally updated at 8:36pm

Those reassurances have never been persuasive — whether on secret warrants to scoop up a news agency’s phone records or secret orders to kill an American suspected of terrorism — especially coming from a president who once promised transparency and accountability.

The administration has now lost all credibility on this issue. Mr. Obama is proving the truism that the executive branch will use any power it is given and very likely abuse it. That is one reason we have long argued that the Patriot Act, enacted in the heat of fear after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks by members of Congress who mostly had not even read it, was reckless in its assignment of unnecessary and overbroad surveillance powers.

H/T (Daily Caller) (FromNJ)