Get PJ Media on your Apple

The PJ Tatler

by
Bryan Preston

Bio

March 12, 2013 - 9:32 am
Page 1 of 2  Next ->   View as Single Page

There are two basic ways to view government. One, it’s a collection and concentration of force and power for the purpose of providing safety and a basis of interaction and commerce for the peaceful, and a means of curtailing and penalizing the predatory. Two, it’s a protection racket designed to enable the wealthy and powerful to concentrate and maintain their power and wealth.

Both views are true, and often not in competition with each other. The latter view of government is embodied by the likes of New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who uses government to busybody and ban everything he doesn’t like (while exempting major corporations from his bans when he can) and Austin city councilman Mike Martinez. Martinez is trying to crack down on an app, SideCar. SideCar lets people who need a ride connect with people who can give them a ride, across town, across the country, whatever. If I’m going somewhere and so are you, SideCar makes it easier to share the ride. Martinez wants to regulate Sidecar users, and he appeared on local radio KLBJ late last week to explain why: If one private citizen gives another private citizen a ride and any money changes hands, it may push wages for cab drivers downward. Cab companies got together and basically bought Martinez’s support one way or another, so he is lobbying on their behalf to crack down on an app, which is really a crackdown on one person’s ability to transact with another without government interfering. His lobbying created a stir ahead of the massive SXSW conference, during which Austin’s downtown traffic becomes a nightmare, and SideCar may serve as an open source relief valve.

What we may need against such government busybodying is a good, old-fashioned rebellion. Cody Wilson is stepping into that role.

Wilson, a University of Texas law student, is quickly becoming one of the most notorious people on the planet. He is the man behind Defense Distributed. That group is behind the recent push to print firearm parts via 3D printers. You’ve heard of Wikipedia and Wikileaks. Wilson’s big idea is the wikiweapon.

Wilson gave a talk at SXSW Monday afternoon. He cuts a contradictory figure, apologizing repeatedly for getting too technical while explaining Defense Distributed’s history, and the modeling and printing of working firearms components, but not apologizing at all for pushing a technology in directions that its inventors probably never intended.

He opens his talk with a joke — a picture of a garden gnome.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (12)
All Comments   (12)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
Remember "Zip Guns"?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Is Mike Martinez outing himself as a retard who did NOT attend UTA? There's been a wall of stranger rides up in the Union since at least the sixties. The app is just an electronic version of " gas, grass or ass." Who, in their right mind, insists that only cab drivers can ferry strangers?

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Actually, notwithstanding a bazillion bumperstickers in the '70s, "gas, grass, or ass, nobody rides free" was and remains illegal most places. The key is requiring, and in some instances merely accepting, something of value in exchange for transportation. If I say to a stranger, "you can ride with me to Podunk" that is perfectly legal. If I say, "you can ride to Podunk with me for $50," I'm in violation of the laws of lots of places. With boats it is requiring any consideration that invokes the requirment of a license. If I took six friends fishing and asked nothing of them, it was perfectly legal. I was probably OK if without my asking somebody brought some booze to share with me and the rest of the party. But if I said to them, "I'll take you out if you buy the gas," that required a license and all the stuff that goes with being a licensed mariner hauling passengers for hire, and asking for grass or ass counts too. When I went out strictly for pleasure, I never took my license with me and, as much as sometimes I wanted to, I never took money people offered for gas. I would cheerfully drink their booze though, and we just won't talk about other things.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Be interesting what this kind of collaborative effort could come up with if the participants decided to design a firearm from scratch with the specific intent of making it 3D print friendly as part of the manufacturing process from the get go.

Kind of like a "people's rifle", that the ordinary everyman could acquire.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
"... I “made” my own AR-15 lower receiver using a curiously shaped paperweight and a helpful CNC operator ... It is possible to buy the unfinished lower receiver over the internet, ... The interesting thing is that ... the machinery I bought fits reasonably well in a car, so the whole shebang is mobile. For less than the cost of the receiver blank, the jig and the tools, I can come to someone’s house and give them the opportunity to make their own AR-15 lower receiver."

http://proteinwisdom.com/?p=47921

Outlaw Gunsmith
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The STL files for the AR-10 lower receiver are here [http://grabcad.com/library/ar10-lower-reciever/files/AR10_Lower_Receiver.stl]. I don't know how accurate they are, but they certainly look correct. And they have the files for MAC-10 receiver, and AR-15 as well (although some of the comments indicate the AR-15 receiver isn't really ready for production). I certainly would not recommend building any of these in plastic, however.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
In one sense, this isn't really all that new: CNC vertical mills have been around for a while to machine parts out of steel or aluminum. The difference is that this new technology involves printers that cost less than $2000, while most serious CNC vertical mills were five figures new. (Yes, there's one used Bridgeport CNC mill on eBay at the moment that is $1025.) As near as I can tell, the STL files that let you print in ABS plastic will also work to machine out of steel.

What I am looking forward to, because it will cause gun control madness, will be when the STL files for the MAC-10 submachine gun or M3A1 submachine gun show up in the public domain.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I see a bull market in early model Mini-14s that are easily converted to fully automatic if you have the tools and skill. Sure wish I hadn't lost mine.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
What about a ceramic poison flechette thrower? That'd be fun, not at all noisy and might start a trend.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
re: syberbpunk
HEAP (Holocaust Education and Avoidance Pod).
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Print all the guns you want, they are regulating the bullets: the size of magazines, no lead bullet (California), Homeland took away billion rounds off the market,...
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I've read up on some of this work and it sounds like part of the plot of "Cryptonomicon". Part of the plot includes a Jewish character who looks to use the Internet startup he founds to develop a "pod" that would contain information and plans to wage an insurgency. All of this info would be set up in a data haven. The idea would be any oppressed people could get the information and form a resistance movement (including weapons) to stop genocide.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
View All