I used to live in Connecticut, not more than perhaps 15 miles from Newtown. Like most states in our Republic, large swaths of Connecticut are rather sleepy, quiet, and quaint. People rise and sleep under a blanket of normalcy and routine. The injection of even the slightest bit of disruptive violence into these communities, to say nothing of the slaughter of children near Christmastime, is like nothing so much as the kind of nightmares you get when sick with a high fever. You may not believe in the Devil, but he believes in you.

Mass violence, especially in the form of mass shootings by young males, has reached a pathological level in the United States relative to other Western nations. Most of these incidents trigger debates about “gun control.” Fine. Seldom discussed in the mainstream media, however, is the correlation between such incidents and the mass drugging of our youth. Given the undeniably frequent coincidence of school shootings and antidepressant use in the United States, I am waiting to hear which psychiatric drugs the Connecticut shooter was using. I am not Thomas Szasz or R.D. Laing, nor do I belong to a movement that views Big Pharma as a kind of biomedical Trilateral Commission. I could be wrong. But if my gut feeling proves correct, and the acronym “SSRI” appears in any news reports over the next few days, we perhaps need to add psychiatry to our list of national discussions.