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by
Howard Nemerov

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May 11, 2011 - 3:07 pm

Pete Winkler in Texas Senator Glenn Hegar’s (R-18) office tried to explain the motive behind Senate Bill 905, which extends special concealed carry privileges to legislators and other government employees.

Winkler said this bill was motivated by safety concerns in reaction to the Gabrielle Giffords shooting. He said legislators see a need to protect themselves against violent attackers, because they vote on difficult issues which may enrage some people.

Why not journalists, for example, whose writing angers readers? Pete said that if legislators were to extend these privileges to more people, it wouldn’t pass.

So there you have it: They can pass special self-defense privileges for themselves, but when it comes to your safety, “it wouldn’t pass.”

When asked about how it’s going to appear to constituents, Pete said: “I understand that this appears” to be a vote favoring special classes. He referred to the issue as “difficult to speak to” a few times.

He couldn’t answer questions such as: Do you understand the motive behind what some have proposed as the 28th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which essentially would mean that elected representatives cannot make laws that don’t apply equally to them?

Being a loyal employee of Hegar, Pete considered such questions as “disagreement” or “your opinion,” as opposed to acknowledging that he had no answer except to admit that this is a case where the legislature is making a law that applies only to those voting on the measure, plus other special classes made up of government employees.

In their mind, the government is not the People.

Senator Hegar will have to answer this one himself.

Former civilian disarmament supporter and medical researcher Howard Nemerov investigates the civil liberty of self-defense and examines the issue of gun control, resulting in his book Four Hundred Years of Gun Control: Why Isn’t It Working? He appears frequently on NRA News as their “unofficial” analyst and was published in the Texas Review of Law and Politics with David Kopel and Carlisle Moody.
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