Even if one is against intervention in Syria’s civil war, as many are, a rebuke to acting against the use of chemical warfare — when the president has said it is impermissible — could be the greatest harm to the United States in decades. It will embolden our enemies, and give Iran the green light to work harder and faster to obtain a working nuclear arsenal, since they will reach the conclusion that the word of an American president means little. The mullahs will say: If the United States cannot even act against a violation of the rules of international law and the use of chemical weapons, what do have to fear when the president says we cannot obtain a nuclear bomb?

The gamble Obama has taken by going to Congress is one that could easily fail. If he listens to a negative vote and packs it in, he will effectively have sabotaged a U.S. response to Assad that he previously said was necessary. As Sen. Joe Lieberman indicated on Fox News Sunday, America’s credibility and word, not to speak of its influence, will have been damaged possibly beyond repair. That is why he announced he would ask Graham and McCain to vote yes despite any reservations they may have about Obama’s seriousness.

In his announcement of a postponement of any attack, President Obama has acted in a way that I believe marks him as perhaps the worst American president, and certainly one of the most incompetent.  Those who argued during the campaign before his first term that he had achieved virtually nothing in the Senate, and was both inexperienced and not ready to assume the job of chief executive, have been vindicated. Barack Obama should never have been elected to his current job. We are now living through the results of his victory at the polls. I hope that our representatives vote “yes,” and the consequences of a “no” vote will not have to be contemplated.