President Obama’s statement was hardly memorable. But if the DOJ decides to suddenly indict Zimmerman for racial hate crimes and to come up with new “evidence” it somehow failed to find earlier, it will only be because it is once again surrendering to public outcries from the civil rights establishment. At that moment, Barack Obama could come up with his own Sister Souljah moment, and inform the public that the jury verdict must be respected, and that no reason exists to mount another trial on spurious grounds.  Or, he could tell his attorney general to stop wasting taxpayer money by fielding yet another investigation to try to prove a racial motive for Zimmerman’s pursuit of Trayvon Martin.

Let me end by saying that because George Zimmerman was found not guilty and the jury believed the prosecution had not proved the charge of second degree murder beyond reasonable doubt does not mean that Zimmerman is a hero or a role model. He should have listened to the advice of the dispatcher, gone back to his car, and not followed Martin as he was walking back home. He acted precipitously and foolishly, and the entire tragic episode could have been avoided. But once Trayvon Martin accosted him and the struggle ensued, Zimmerman reached for his gun when he believed his life was in danger. One might also have wished that young Martin had simply told Zimmerman he was going back to his father who was in a unit in the development, and not decided to engage in a fight with a man he thought was harassing him.

The outcome is what makes this a tragedy. I sympathize with the Martin family at the loss of their son, and I understand their anger at the verdict and their feeling that, in their eyes, justice was not served. But I have none for those who are seeking to use this tragedy to bolster their own worn-out credentials as civil rights leaders, and who use their so-called authority to create anger and a mob sentiment among the African-American community.