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Ron Radosh

That morning, however, the newspapers had headlines noting that the administration was asking for a softening of proposed sanctions so that Russia and China, two nations that do not want to jeopardize their trade deals with Iran, could sign on.

Clinton stressed the importance of the so-called “proximity talks,” although shrewd observers have all noted that they are likely to lead nowhere. Both Richard Haas and Aaron David Miller recently wrote powerful essays about what Miller calls “the false religion of Mideast peace,” something that Clinton continually invoked, without addressing their concerns. Both men, formerly “realists” and believers in the peace process, now realize its chimerical value.  Instead, she offered her audience what Marty Peretz correctly called big clichés “that are the mark of Obama’s foreign policy.”

At Commentary’s “Contentions” blog, Jennifer Rubin points out that at the recent White House Correspondents’ dinner, WH advisor Denis McDonough sat at  Josh Marshall’s Talking Points Memo table with Brent Scowcroft and Zbig Brzezinski, who are feverishly trying to get Obama to accept their own peace plan with Israel. As Rubin puts it so well:  “One of the administration’s key foreign-policy hands goes to the most highly publicized event in town to hob-nob with the advisor who Obama had sworn during the campaign not to be an advisor, who has suggested that we shoot down Israeli planes if they cross Iraqi air space on the way to Iran, and who wants to impose a peace deal on Israel. And, for good measure, he sits with the purveyors of a website infamous for puff pieces on terrorists and committed to a hard-left anti-Israel line.”

Rubin asks whether a few “carefully worded speeches” by Obama administration officials will in fact bamboozle the leadership of the American Jewish community. Or will they fall over themselves “to make up with the administration”? My answer: unfortunately, the latter  seems to be the case.

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