The answers weren’t that complicated.  All these social welfare programs, affirmative actions, etc. were a signal to African Americans that they were inferior, that somehow they couldn’t make it without help.  This became a self-fulfilling prophecy, a kind of mass Stockholm Syndrome.  And, quite naturally, it engendered a great deal of anger.

The system wasn’t all that different from giving heroin or alcohol to a family member to ease him or her out of their addiction.  It didn’t work but it kept them dependent.

Meanwhile, plenty of African Americans succeeded without this dubious “help,” because, quite clearly, they realized they didn’t need it and went on with their lives.  Motivating the supposed “help” the others were getting were two factors: 1. liberal white racism and 2. a desire on the part of the Democratic Party to turn African Americans into a class that would vote for them perpetually, something that party has clearly succeeded in to the complete detriment of African Americans, if we believe even part of all the depressing statistics.

So how do we counter this? First of all, by calling out the true racists, not the fake ones. A recent example is Rep. Barbara Lee’s (D-CA) attack on Paul Ryan for his actually rather tepid remarks on poverty.  She called Ryan a racist, when Lee herself, an African American, is far more racist than Ryan, working against the interests of her people.  Lee, Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton and others of their ilk are oddly like the Jewish sonderkommandos and kapos who lorded it over their own brethren in the concentration camps.  Well, perhaps not that bad, but bad enough.

As I have written before, and recently, as has PJM’s Zombie, instead of waiting to be attacked, we should call out the real racists first.  Offense, not defense.  The country is waiting.  And, most of all, you will be doing minorities a favor.  They are the ones, more than any, being oppressed.  Don’t be afraid of helping them get free of their oppressors by telling the truth.  It’s the most humane thing we could all do.

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