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Roger L. Simon

Benghazi — The Motion Picture

February 15th, 2013 - 12:00 am

Unfortunately, I am not optimistic. The major studios certainly would pass.  They would never risk embarrassing a sitting president.  The production of such a film would be up to brave independents.  And a fictional film — not a documentary — on such a topic would be expensive, especially if you wanted a competent, professional production.  If you don’t have that, you have nothing.

Nevertheless, it’s time for people on the right to get to work attempting to make films like a Benghazi.  The subject matter — domestic and foreign — is limitless, so much has not been touched.

A few documentaries have been made recently, but the truth about docs is that they have nothing like the reach of fictional features. They rarely do more than preach to the choir, even when they are successful (and that’s rare). A well-made fictional film can do much more.  It can stealthily infiltrate minds. It can change people’s heads without them knowing it. It can attract and influence young people through entertainment.

When I announced last week I was leaving my executive post at PJM to try to do some of this myself, I was quite serious.  I am already deeply involved writing a script on a subject I cannot reveal — but trust me, it’s incendiary.  It’s almost like a fictional rebuttal to Tuesday’s State of the Union address, which was a blueprint for pervasive government.

Ironically, or maybe not so ironically, this undertaking is being financed by a Russian company for a young Russian director. These people have first-hand knowledge and then some of the perils of socialism.  They don’t have to read Hayek, or 1984 for that matter.  They lived it.

I hope that American companies will soon emerge to address similar material.  I and several other people I know are ready to roll up our sleeves.

Also read: The Unreality-Based Presidency

(Thumbnail on PJM homepage assembled from multiple Shutterstock.com images.)

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