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Belmont Club

Leaks, Intentional Or Otherwise

July 30th, 2013 - 3:22 am

The Bradley Manning decision is due out soon. He may or may not walk, depending on how the court rules. But politicians can leak secrets too — and walk — as history shows.

Andrew Jackson May (June 24, 1875 – September 6, 1959) was a Kentucky attorney and influential New Deal-era politician, best known for his chairmanship of the House Military Affairs Committee during World War II, and his subsequent conviction for bribery. May was a Democratic member of United States House of Representatives from Kentucky during the Seventy-second to Seventy-ninth sessions of Congress.”

Historian Clay Blair claimed that May was responsible for a major release of highly confidential military information during World War II, known as the May Incident. In that incident, U.S. submarines had been conducting a successful undersea war against Japanese shipping during World War II, frequently escaping Japanese anti-submarine depth charge attacks. However, the deficiencies of Japanese depth-charge tactics were revealed in a press conference held in June 1943 by Congressman May on his return from a war zone junket. At this press conference, May revealed the highly sensitive fact that American submarines had a high survival rate because Japanese depth charges were typically fuzed to explode at too shallow a depth. Various press associations sent this leaked news story over their wires and many newspapers (including one in Honolulu, Hawaii), published it.

It was subsequently discovered that Japanese naval antisubmarine forces were adjusting their depth charges to explode at a deeper depth. Vice Admiral Charles A. Lockwood, commander of the U.S. submarine fleet in the Pacific, later estimated that May’s security breach cost the United States Navy as many as ten submarines and 800 crewmen killed in action, stating “I hear Congressman May said the (Japanese) depth charges are not set deep enough. He would be pleased to know (they) set them deeper now.” A report from the U.S. Navy’s Pacific Submarine Fleet determined that Japanese ASW forces failed to uncover the maximum test depth ability of U.S. fleet submarines during the war.  However, the report made no finding as to whether Japanese ASW forces altered their depth charge attacks to deeper settings as a consequence of May’s revelation to the press.

Ten subs on Eternal Patrol may have been sent to the bottom by Congressman May. The original Bungo Pete. But he was an ally of Roosevelt’s. Maybe even helped him win World War 2. Perhaps in the calculus of history May’s political cooperation with FDR was worth more than the submarines lost. Maybe. Just don’t ask the men who went to the bottom of the sea.

It’s little realized the press keeps secrets whose confidence they feel entitled to protect. The Associated Press, for example, was outraged when Eric Holder wiretapped them in its attempts to plug a leak.  One man’s leak is another man’s betrayed secret. When the press leaks confidential cables it is called “investigative journalism”. But when the FBI tries to find out how a journalist gets his secrets that is called suppression. The New York Times describes the current court wrangle over a reporter’s right to keep secrets in pursuit of a story.

WASHINGTON — In a major ruling on press freedoms, a divided federal appeals court on Friday ruled that James Risen, an author and a reporter for The New York Times, must testify in the criminal trial of a former Central Intelligence Agency official charged with providing him with classified information.

In a 118-page set of opinions, two members of a three-judge panel for the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, in Richmond, Va., ruled that the First Amendment does not protect reporters who receive unauthorized leaks from being forced to testify against the people suspected of leaking to them. A district court judge who had ruled in Mr. Risen’s case had said that it did.

“Clearly, Risen’s direct, firsthand account of the criminal conduct indicted by the grand jury cannot be obtained by alternative means, as Risen is without dispute the only witness who can offer this critical testimony,” wrote Chief Judge William Byrd Traxler Jr., who was joined by Judge Albert Diaz in Friday’s ruling.

It’s a perfect symmetry. The government wants to keep its information classified. Risen wants to keep his informant’s name classified. Too bad they can’t both have their cake and eat it.

Risen’s sources would of course be “chilled” by the knowledge that their identities are to be revealed. Doubtless the confidential sources which Manning disclosed are likewise chilled, or at least fear being chilled to room temperature, by their publication. Maybe Manning didn’t mean it. Neither did May mean any harm. It was just one of those things.

Information can heal or it can kill; it can be as beneficial as medicine or as lethal as a bullet. Whenever you decide to keep a secret or reveal it creates a risk. Take the case of Operation Red Wing. A group of SEALs was inserted behind Taliban lines to stalk the enemy. Just as they dug in a bunch of goatherds happened by. They let them go.

After moving to a pre-determined, covered overwatch position, from which the SEALs could observe the Named Areas of Interest, the team was discovered by local goatherders. After determining that they were civilians, and not combatants, Lieutenant Murphy had them released, as was protocol in the area of operations at the time, according to rules of engagement. Within two hours of letting the goatherders go, the SEAL Reconnaissance and Surveillance team was ambushed by Shah’s men, a group estimated to number anywhere from eight to 100-plus men.

The goatherds probably went straight to the Taliban. What would the UN say? “Of course you must let them go.” Sure. But I wonder whether the UN would stick around to find out what was coming next. Letting them go is analogous to taking the risk of not keeping operational security absolute. The SEALs decided to accept the risk of not keeping a secret in exchange for the moral benefit of not killing goatherders. Only one of them survived. They bought the ticket, they took the ride.

Keeping secrets has a cost. Likewise exposing them has a cost. Interrogating prisoners has a cost. Not interrogating prisoners has a cost. The whole problem of politics and warfare — indeed of living in this world — is largely a question of who gets left holding the bag.  It helps to realize there’s no free lunch. Alas that’s not self-evident to everybody. But  ultimately someone pays the bill.

The question is who.

Many well intentioned and idealistic people believe they can come away from their activities absolutely cleanly. “No I never did nothing wrong. No not me.” Well one likes it to be that way. Perhaps Manning thought his leak would be a sword of fire to slash away the curtain of darkness. And doubtless he succeeded to some extent. But swords almost always draw blood. That’s just how it works.

If Manning was prepared to go to jail to make his point then he saw the price and paid it.  It must have crossed the minds of those SEALs that their decision could be very expensive. Sometimes you’re willing to spin the wheel. In this case somebody else besides Manning will probably make the money on the book deal; someone else will play him in the mini-series and the actual Manning himself will find himself experiencing unpleasantness to a greater or lesser degree.

You wonder about the world somtimes. The difficulty in squaring the circles in this life is probably one of the main reasons many people believe in God. We leave the scene in an unsatisfactorily untidy condition. And it’s natural to want an overtime period to fix things. There are too many loose ends in life and so few happily ever afters.


Did you know that you can purchase some of these books and pamphlets by Richard Fernandez and share them with you friends? They will receive a link in their email and it will automatically give them access to a Kindle reader on their smartphone, computer or even as a web-readable document.

The War of the Words for $3.99, Understanding the crisis of the early 21st century in terms of information corruption in the financial, security and political spheres
Rebranding Christianity for $3.99, or why the truth shall make you free
The Three Conjectures at Amazon Kindle for $1.99, reflections on terrorism and the nuclear age
Storming the Castle at Amazon Kindle for $3.99, why government should get small
No Way In at Amazon Kindle $8.95, print $9.99
Storm Over the South China Sea $0.99, how China is restarting history in the Pacific
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Top Rated Comments   

The focus on downtown entertainment (festivals, baseball games, etc.) is the give-away. The light rail is a pipeline to funnel suburban wallets directly downtown to venues (and developers) that pay squeeze to the city politicos. I've seen this movie before, and it has nothing to do with providing transportation services to the people of Detroit.

The attraction of light rail is that it's rigid infrastructure that cannot be re-routed. It's insurance for the developers. If you link the suburbs to a particular downtown development, the city can't just move the station. It becomes a near-permanent incentive to site revenue-generating events at the venue. For the machine politicians, it means bribes from the developers, a cut from the subsidized loans being used for construction, and skim from the (unionized) venues.

In a way, the legislator is right and the investigative journalist is badlly deluded. That money is not fungible--it would never be available to improve city services. This is entirely disconnected from rebuilding Detroit--it has no impact on Detroit one way or the other. Except for one thing. It's akin to the "oil curse" of the Middle East and Venezuela--it helps give the political leadership of Detroit their private revenue stream regardless of whether the city itself succeeds or fails.

And the People of Detroit? Who cares?
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (12)
All Comments   (12)
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'Many well intentioned and idealistic people believe they can come away from their activities absolutely cleanly. 'No I never did nothing wrong. No not me.'”

And I think Lois Lerner sincerely believes that. Or as the camp commandant in "Sophie's Choice" asked, "What Sophie?! Do you think I'm a monster?!"

Me, if ObamaCare is fully implemented, I'm thinking of going with the Pope -- "Who am I to judge?" Life will be easier that way.

BTW, wretchard, I got a strange e-mail regarding my subscription to WSJ and the Customer Service rep who signed it was "Precious Aurora Aphrodite." Found her in the Philippines, and WSJ said she was legit. Is that kind of name common there?



38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Precious and Aurora are fairly common. Aphrodite not so much. But you do find these names. There was a politician called Ben Hur something. Another fellow was Voltaire something. I know a family where the kids are named Minerva, Venus and other Greek god names.

One prominent Chinese family named their kids after the US Presidents. Washington something, Abraham something. I met a Muslim named Pershing.

It could happen, but it's not common.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Mexicans do it also. I have a MexAm neighbor named Juvenal and know another named Ulises.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
The Man does have a stash. Half a billion for light rail. That's some stash. Why won't the Man give it to the people?
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
If the military won't condemn and expel a fanatic muslim captain and instead retain him, promote him to major, and transfer him to Fort Hood where he slaughters his fellow soldiers, then how can we be surprised by the likes of Manning and Snowden? Secrets are not "inclusive" and hurt others feelings. It is bad form to name anyone as enemy. Gen. George Washington was too intolerant and xenophobic when he condemned Benedict Arnold for divulging West Point's defensive plans.

Can this mentality be why the NFL has to go? Team sports are too divisive and demeaning with their concept of "losers." The Steelers and Ravens should huddle together to plan the game for an inclusive and non-confrontational outcome.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Since we humans are made in every kind of wonky, why would we ever expect we can transform the world into some perfectly aligned shining Utopia? Utopia wallahs are displaying just one more kind of wonky.

That nattering nabob lady with the landscape architecture degree, believes that spending $500 million of someone else's money to run a straight line railroad directly to baseball games held in a third world city (Detroit), will turn Detroit into Camelot.

All I can say is that numbskull nitwits apparently have very nice offices.

38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Numbskull Nitwitery seems to be a growth industry amongst Nattering Nabobs.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment

The focus on downtown entertainment (festivals, baseball games, etc.) is the give-away. The light rail is a pipeline to funnel suburban wallets directly downtown to venues (and developers) that pay squeeze to the city politicos. I've seen this movie before, and it has nothing to do with providing transportation services to the people of Detroit.

The attraction of light rail is that it's rigid infrastructure that cannot be re-routed. It's insurance for the developers. If you link the suburbs to a particular downtown development, the city can't just move the station. It becomes a near-permanent incentive to site revenue-generating events at the venue. For the machine politicians, it means bribes from the developers, a cut from the subsidized loans being used for construction, and skim from the (unionized) venues.

In a way, the legislator is right and the investigative journalist is badlly deluded. That money is not fungible--it would never be available to improve city services. This is entirely disconnected from rebuilding Detroit--it has no impact on Detroit one way or the other. Except for one thing. It's akin to the "oil curse" of the Middle East and Venezuela--it helps give the political leadership of Detroit their private revenue stream regardless of whether the city itself succeeds or fails.

And the People of Detroit? Who cares?
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Just heard a report on the local news of Congresswoman Sanchez talking - bragging - about the 100,000 jobs that the California Bullet Train from nowhere to nowhere costing ??$98,000,000,000 is going to produce. They were giving an award to Congresswoman Bass for getting some federal money for the preliminaries - and not very much money. Not much of that $98b is yet funded from anywhere. They keep saying they will attract private funds, but so far - nada.

Here's the kicker, even such an absurd number is actually not absurd at all, if the thing could actually be operated at a profit, it might be worth the acquisition even at that price. That's the price of maybe 100 jumbo jets. But there's no way it can produce the revenues of 100 jumbo jets, and as a first estimate, given all the stations, the operating cost will probably be about the same. And frankly the jets barely turn a profit these days, look at airline results.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Isn't there a long list of confidential items that the NYTimes published during the Bush administration? The most famous of which is that the NSA was listening in on Osama bin Laden's satellite phone?
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
She has a master's degree in landscape architecture and regional planning... and if it's not built she'll drink more than two beers and get in her car and get arrested for drunk driving and ruin her life... so obviously we should listen to her, because also there's obviously not a limited amount of money in the world.

Somewhere in all that there's what she perceives to be a coherent argument for a light rail system to save Detroit. As long as she doesn't actually have to use it. Or pay for it.

Oh, but I would bet dollars to donuts she would stand to be getting something out of the deal.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Some things are real. Death is real. The Constitution is not a suicide pact.

Those charged with keeping secrets have an obligation not to over classify so as to retain the integrity of the classification system. Those divulging secrets have to weigh the intended benefit, the greater good or their personal reward, against the cost they should expect.

My suspicion is that the Leftists, who are conspiracy theorists by nature, are rigging the casino. They suppress evidence and then claim that we can only discuss what is in the public record they manipulate. The High School level games played by the "independent journalist' debating Eli Lake in the video reek of mendacity.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
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