One can only conclude that the authorities themselves jumped to conclusions before anyone else. That they were sure from the first instant what they were dealing with since they knew exactly what words or phrases nobody could refer to. And you can’t do that unless you yourself have jumped to the same conclusions nobody else should jump to.

Thus, references to Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, or Mexicans appeared little censored. Why, you can chaff these people with no consequence. But words referring to certain identities we are not supposed to associate with the news stories are quickly punished such that the UK authorities, who lack the manpower to monitor individuals with terror files at MI5 as long as one’s arm, can still find an ample number of policemen to track down on Facebook and Twitter.

The Mirror says that authorities expect Google to crack down on hate sites responsible for inciting attacks on British soldiers, but what is the search term that should be proscribed? Probably Google is expected to jump to conclusions without actually doing so.

To their eternal credit, those who shall not be named have completely seen through the childish efforts of the establishment. The attackers know full well how contemptible and spineless the political and media elites of Western nations have become. Whatever their defects, the enemy appears to possess one virtue that the enlightened citizen of the West can envy: they can still see  the hand in front of their face. They can still add two and two to make four.

The law-abiding Westerner is no longer supposed to be able to do that. In some paradoxical way, the enemies of the West are now freer than their targets; free, by virtue of their defiance, from the mind-boggling hypocrisy and doublethink that encumber anyone who still subscribes to conventional wisdom. If radical Islamism has any merit at all, it lies in seeing a supine and defenseless culture for what it really is: a fat, idiotic target waiting to be plundered.


The Three Conjectures at Amazon Kindle for $1.99
Storming the Castle at Amazon Kindle for $3.99
No Way In at Amazon Kindle $8.95, print $9.99
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