And Kerry waited some more.  When the czar was in the proper mood, he received his American visitor.  Kerry was full of good cheer.  And why not?  We share a common vision, don’t we?  ‘The United States believes that we share some very significant common interests with respect to Syria — stability in the region, not having extremists creating problems throughout the region and elsewhere.’

I’m not a big believer in stability as an American strategic objective, since change and turmoil are the constant themes of world history, and America is in any event a revolutionary country.  For extras, the idea that we and the Russians have common interests regarding Syria flies in  the face of our proclaimed objectives:  Putin wants Assad to win and rule on, while Obama wants Assad to lose and go away. So I refuse to believe that Kerry went all the way to Moscow, and sat impatiently for hours and hours just to deliver that drivel.  There had to be more to it than that.  No doubt Iran came up.  And maybe Putin told Kerry that sanctions were a very bad idea, what with the next Iranian electoral farce scheduled in a few weeks.  That might “explain” Kerry’s call to Congress to take it easy.

The good news is that Congress isn’t buying it.  New sanctions were being voted, and implemented, even as the secretary of state was lobbying for the mullahs.

The bad news is that Hezbollah’s supreme leader, Hassan Nasrallah, announced that his terror organization would soon receive “game-changing” weapons from Assad.

A sure sign of stability, I suppose.

(Thumbnail on PJM homepage based on a modified image by s_bukley / Shutterstock.com.)