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Dr. Dre: The Next Steve Jobs?

The quirky style of the hip-hop billionaire is a perfect fit for Apple.

by
Stephen Green

Bio

June 10, 2014 - 8:00 am

The Wall Street Journal’s Apple reporting is generally so bad that I rarely bother reading their stories. The widely and thoroughly discredited book, Haunted Empire: Apple After Steve Jobs, was written by WSJ’s own Yukari Iwatani Kane, which was really the pinnacle of the kind of story WSJ routinely published about the company. So it was a bit of a shock over the weekend when just about every tech blog I read linked to this story comparing Steve Jobs with brand-new Apple employee Dr. Dre.

But there’s good stuff in there, including this:

Behind the scenes, Dr. Dre—whose real name is Andre Young —has quietly played an equally powerful role developing and protecting the Beats brand, eschewing market research for gut instinct at every turn. Though his main obsession is perfecting the sound of the company’s signature high-end headphones, the 49-year-old fitness-obsessed music producer weighs in decisively on everything from TV ads and font styles to the wordiness of descriptions on the Beats Music streaming service.

As one colleague says, Dr. Dre serves as Beats’ “cultural barometer” of what is cool.

But Dr. Dre’s process is mysterious, colleagues say: His assessments are usually immediate, personal and articulated sparely. He often dismisses ideas such as posing for clichéd photos in a recording studio as too “corny” or “cheesy.” Or he’ll wave them off with a terse “I’m not feeling that.”

The Beats acquisition is starting to make more and more sense.

It might still prove to be misguided or unprofitable, but I’m finally “feeling” what Tim Cook must have been when he decided to plunk down $3 billion for the company.

But then there’s another bit slightly further down:

Dr. Dre’s perfectionist impulse, coupled with his disregard for artificial deadlines, have meant that “he doesn’t put out a lot of material,” despite being a workaholic, said Paul Rosenberg, a lawyer and manager of one of Dr. Dre’s protégés, rapper Eminem.

That could portend friction at his new employer, Apple, which agreed to buy Beats for $3 billion last month. [Emphasis added]

Putting in tons of work on very few highly profitable products? Why, Dre sounds nothing at all like Apple, whose entire product line could fit comfortably on your kitchen table.

Isn’t there one damn reporter at that paper who understands Apple?

*****

Cross-posted from Vodkapundit

Stephen Green began blogging at VodkaPundit.com in early 2002, and has served as PJMedia's Denver editor since 2008. He's one of the hosts on PJTV, and one-third of PJTV's Trifecta team with Scott Ott and Bill Whittle. Steve lives with his wife and sons in the hills and woods of Monument, Colorado, where he enjoys the occasional lovely adult beverage.

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You can tell that apple fanboys are desperate when they look for their salvation in a hip hop king. At the end of Steve Jobs life Apple was already doomed to decline. The company had repeated every mistake that they made when they went against Wintel in the 1980s and early 90s. Just as Apple fell technologically behind the Intel based machines the iPhone is hopelessly behind Android and even Windows phones. By the time the new iPhone comes out with their latest device the technology has already been superseded. Just as the Mac became just another Intel based computer the iPhone OS now looks and act like Android, well looks like it anyway since you can't multitask with it.
The long delayed introduction of AppleTV highlights the flaws in the company’s business model. By the time they even got to prototype a Samsung TV was already on the market.


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