Get PJ Media on your Apple

PJM Lifestyle

The 10 Most Dangerous National Parks

It's vacation time! Let's try to avoid getting crushed, drowned, or eaten.

by
Bonnie Ramthun

Bio

June 7, 2014 - 7:00 am
Page 1 of 10  Next ->   View as Single Page

Finding out the number of accidents and fatalities in our beautiful national parks isn’t easy. The National Park Service doesn’t want to scare away visitors so they don’t offer a handy guide to the number of tourists who fall, drown, are trampled, or are eaten while visiting our wild places. However there’s enough data in news reports and studies to come up with a top ten list of our most dangerous national parks. Which do you think tops the list? Yellowstone? Yosemite? Denali? Take a look and see if you’re as surprised as I was. Let’s start with number 10.

10.) The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, New Jersey and Pennsylvania

delaware-water-gap-660

This lovely river valley encompasses 67,000 acres of land on both sides of the Delaware River in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Varied species of birds, mammals and fish call this area home and nearly two million visitors a year come to the area to enjoy boating and water recreation sports.

That’s what’ll kill ya in the Delaware Water Gap, which begins our Top 10 Most Dangerous National Parks. Failing to wear a lifejacket while on the river is the number one cause of death. Adding alcohol consumption ups the risk. The Delaware River looks tranquil but can have unexpected currents which can overwhelm a swimmer. Keep the life jackets on and enjoy this beautiful (and only occasionally deadly) recreation area.

Top Rated Comments   
It appears that most of the deaths cited are perfectly avoidable. So, these parks might just be one federal government activity that does some good - cleaning up the gene pool.
6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
Over the years, I've spent an estimated total of 42 weeks on Lake Mead, and I'm not surprised it's considered the deadliest recreation area. Boating, houseboating, water-skiing, and fishing are the most popular activities. I'd say the biggest dangers are over-powered boats, youthful exuberance, and people who have no familiarity with boat handling. In all that time, however, I can't recall ever speaking with a Park Ranger, and even saw them, only rarely.
6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (15)
All Comments   (15)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
WTH...I'll stay home where it's safe. All I've ever done at home is break 2 toes, hyper-extend my shoulder (resulting in "frozen shoulder") & get cancer...home seems safer. ;)
5 weeks ago
5 weeks ago Link To Comment
I have never had a deadly accident with my Hydrophones. Even on Lake Mead.
5 weeks ago
5 weeks ago Link To Comment
"I've never had a 'deadly accident'"...OBVIOUSLY!!
5 weeks ago
5 weeks ago Link To Comment
Minor point on headline for number 9- North Carolina, not South Carolina.
5 weeks ago
5 weeks ago Link To Comment
"This jewel of Alaska is capped by North America’s tallest peak, 20,130 foot Mt. McKinley."

McKinley is, indeed, North America’s tallest peak. It is also the world's tallest peak (on land).

"No, you idiot! Everybody knows that Everest is the world's tallest peak!"

No, Everest is the world's highest peak.

When my daughter sits on my shoulders, she is higher than me, but she is not taller than me.

http://geology.com/records/highest-mountain-in-the-world.shtml
6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
"runs along the Blue Ridge of the Appalachian Mountains "

Ahem.

Yes, they are part of the Appalachian Mountain System. No, they are not "the Blue Ridge of the Appalachian Mountains". They are simply called, "the Blue Ridge Mountains", and they are beautiful.


Come visit us some time!

6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
It appears that most of the deaths cited are perfectly avoidable. So, these parks might just be one federal government activity that does some good - cleaning up the gene pool.
6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
Howdy A22BD7
I was expecting that I'd get to say that the wild is still wild, but you're closer to the mark. Most of the causes of death described here could happen in one's own yard or to and from work.
I understand that, measured by size, Glacier National Park has the highest incidence of bear-human encounters that end badly. That's the wild being wild.
Rivers being cold and unpredictable, trails being slippery, gravity being the law regardless of whether Obama enforces it -- they are sorta the wild being wild also.
6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
I grew up in the West and have consistently visited the National Parks in the West, but now I see I need to spread my wings and make tracks for the parks in East. Thanks for the informative article.
6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
Odd that my original comment got reported. It was on topic (about the recreational are rated the deadliest), and didn't seem to me to be at all controversial.

Go figure!
6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
Howdy Gridley
To a near certainty, a fan using a small touch device meant to Like you and Reported you instead. After hundreds of such reports, the buttons remain poorly placed.
Not that we are bitter.
6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
Nor do we cling.

(To the hope that it will be changed!)

6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
Boy, that's the truth.
5 weeks ago
5 weeks ago Link To Comment
Over the years, I've spent an estimated total of 42 weeks on Lake Mead, and I'm not surprised it's considered the deadliest recreation area. Boating, houseboating, water-skiing, and fishing are the most popular activities. I'd say the biggest dangers are over-powered boats, youthful exuberance, and people who have no familiarity with boat handling. In all that time, however, I can't recall ever speaking with a Park Ranger, and even saw them, only rarely.
6 weeks ago
6 weeks ago Link To Comment
Gridley, as a Las Vegas resident I can see that these "mis-judgements" fall into the realm of..."what happens in .vegas, stays in Vegas"!!
5 weeks ago
5 weeks ago Link To Comment
View All