Media frenzies are now the norm. There’s no use complaining about them; we can only grade them.

With something like the Boston Marathon bombing or the Newtown school shooting, a certain amount and type of news coverage is obviously justified.  But with the following media stories, I would say they were worth a Bret Baier Grapevine segment at most, but many made top 10 lists of the year’s media stories.

The Phil Robertson kerfluffle didn’t make this list—yet.  I’ve only watched Duck Dynasty once. I thought it was better than I expected, but not appointment TV.  But I like their family a lot.  Robertson made some substantive points—and the one that everyone says was “gross” is something that has crossed every straight male’s mind at some point.  And I mean every one.

Also, the discussion has been valuable—even when some of the commentary is not—as a Rorschach test for the pop culture and a measure of how many Americans are following the party line.

The rest of these, I would argue, don’t come close to that standard.

Via Instagram /

Via Instagram /

7.  Paula Deen

Paul Deen is getting referenced again in the controversy around Phil Robertson of Duck Dynasty.  Yeah, let’s compare apples and cinder blocks.

Paula Deen, if it’s a story, is a story about lawsuit abuse.  It’s a story about the media feeding frenzy.  But Paula Deen herself should sell cookbooks and stay out of my newscasts.

Granted, she didn’t try to get there.  She was minding her own business on the Cooking Channel (which was why I had never heard of her) when some former employees sued her.  They lost the lawsuit in slam dunk fashion, but not before Mrs. Deen fell all over herself in a deposition in which she had to answer questions about whether she (or her hiring practices) was racist.

Not that I’m condoning perjury, but what special kind of fool blurts out something in a deposition that only a spouse could sell them out on—especially since doing so would hurt the spouse financially in equal measure? Did Paula really think that if a lawyer asked her husband if she said “ni**er” a lot, he would say, “Hmmmm, well back 20 years ago after she was mugged, I think she called that guy bad names…”?

Paula Deen then proceeded to show up on morning shows and give tearful apologies that would make Tammy Faye Bakker cringe.

But other than being really bad at being in the national spotlight outside her cooking show bubble, I can’t for the life of me think of what Paula Deen did wrong—or why anyone should care.