Down with Israel

When the Israel-hating Electronic Intifada site accused the Guardian of failing to support the “one-state solution” to the Israeli-Palestinian issue—whereby Israel and surrounding Arab populations would blend into a single Arab state and Israel would cease to exist—longtime Guardian columnist and associate editor Seumas Milne sprang to his paper’s defense.

“We have,” he asserted, “had numerous articles supporting the Palestinian right to return (including by regular columnists)….”

“One-state solution” and “Palestinian right of return”—they mean the same thing. The latter variant entails millions of descendants of Arabs who fled Israel during the 1948-1949 Arab-Israeli war “returning” to Israel and demographically swamping its Jewish population. The result is the same: perhaps some Jews living (very precariously) in a majority-Arab state, but no Israel.

And lest there be any remaining doubt where the Guardian stands, its editorial on October 21 this year declared: “Amid deepening despair as to the viability of a two-state solution, [the one-state] option…is only going to attract more attention.”

 It may not have been, as CiF Watch noted, an explicit endorsement of “one state,” butat least…a step in that direction….”

A step, that is, in a blatantly antisemitic direction. Among “the ways in which antisemitism manifests itself,” the EUMC Working Definition of Antisemitism cites: “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination….”

Or, to put it differently, promoting a Middle East where the 21 Arab states of the Arab League, plus at least one state dubbed “Palestinian,” continue to exist—but no Israel. For the radical, Palestinian-enamored left that the Guardian represents, that would be one Jewish state too many.