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13 Week Countdown To Christmas: When Something’s Just Not Right

I'd really like this year to be different. Week 1.

by
Rhonda Robinson

Bio

September 28, 2013 - 12:44 pm
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1. Track Days on a Physical Calendar. 

In my last 13 Week series, 13 Weeks to Family Financial Freedom, I learned that you must have a clear “yes or no” type goal to create the desired new habit using a Seinfeld calendar. While I don’t intend to bring Christmas in full force starting in September– I do need to be aware it’s coming like a freight train.

No more being caught by surprise– after all, I hear it comes on the same day every year. I will mark off my Christmas countdown calendar daily to make sure it does.

 

2. Send Out Christmas Cards.

This should be easy. I think I still have about three years worth, half addressed and some are even stamped.

 

3. Create and Stay Within a Small Budget. 

We’ve never been prone to putting Christmas on a credit card; however, we’ve usually had the cash to pay for it. This year it will take real planning and tight budgeting.

 

4. Find New Ways to Create a Meaningful Christmas.

In “How a Church Turned a Christmas Blessing Into a Curse: Why Good Intentions Are Never Enough“ I wrote of our struggle through Christmas’ past. This year, I want to find ways to be the blessing I once prayed for.

 

5. Create New Traditions. 

As I’ve spent the last few weeks reading Shmuley Boteach’s Kosher JesusI’ve developed a desire to break from hollow traditions and religious assumptions. This Christmas season, I will trace the roots to some of our excepted traditions and attempt to redeem them or discard them in light of what is uncovered. My hope is that new traditions that deepen our faith will result.

 

6. Prepare Our Home and Hearts For The Peace of Christmas.

Creating an atmosphere of peace and joy is an intentional act. It can’t be bought. It must be created. This year, as financial and health constraints continue, creating a home that is a refuge for my adult children and grandchildren will take an extra dose of resolve and creativity.

 

7. Take the Distance Out of Being a Long Distance Grandmother.

This is probably the hardest. I’m a complete failure at being a long distance grandmother. I forget birthdays, (Yes I know there’s an app for that.) I seldom send cards. It’s not that I don’t want to, I believe that my failure is also due to lack of conscious awareness. If I’m right, my countdown calendar should help.

It must. When you have 22 grandchildren, that’s a lot of little eyes looking up.

 

When does it feel like Christmas to you?

 

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Photo credits Shutterstock:  Khakimullin AleksandrwacomkaCURAphotography

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Rhonda Robinson writes on the social, political and parenting issues currently shaping the American family. She lives with her husband and teenage daughter in Middle Tennessee. www.amotherslife.me Follow on twitter @amotherslife

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I'm non religious, but we still celebrate Christmas as more of a tradition. This year as things are tight as always, I will enjoy reading your posts as I always enjoy hearing what you have to say. Last Christmas was pretty awful for us here in CT and our pre-Christmas months included two profound personal losses, Hurricane Sandy, and then Sandy Hook. Christmas pretty much became a day to think about those we lost.

My grandmother had over 20 grandchildren. She sent us each $5 in a card and my mother also had over 20 and carried on that tradition, but upped it to $25. My son received the last one she ever sent and it was precious to him.
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