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Ignorance Of Dietary Laws Is No Excuse. You’ll Still Suffer The Consequences.

Searching for nuggets of truth in Jordan S. Rubin's The Maker's Diet.

by
Rhonda Robinson

Bio

September 16, 2013 - 2:40 pm
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If God is indeed the creator of the universe, and I believe He is, then scientific understanding should expound on the truth of His laws. In digging into The Maker’s Diet, I’m not looking to embrace –or sell you on–another diet program with the stamp of religion on it. Rather, to look closely at another man’s journey and discovery of those long ago — all but lost for most of us — laws of the Creator.

In How These 3 Simple Principles of a Judeo-Christian Diet Saved My FamilyI wrote about the health crisis that served as a catalyst for our transformation.

This week’s reading of Jordan S. Rubin’s The Maker’s Diet, uncovered this small clip that summarized the heart of what we discovered that September. Rubin packed a lot of truth on this page that I really think we should take the next couple of weeks to unpack.

“The laws of God are enforced and are as sure as the law of gravity.”

We know these laws are enforced by the ill consequences of obesity, deterioration and disease, just as the law of gravity is enforced by the splat on the ground.

Once the law of gravity was discovered and understood, it was not only obeyed but also harnessed for our betterment. That is exactly what we want to do here.

We’ve all felt the consequences for our dietary actions. It’s time we learned the rules.

Have you ever found something in the Bible, you knew was so far advanced, perhaps just now scientifically explained — that it removed all doubt it was God?

Join the conversation and the journey with me. Order The Maker’s Diet here.

Makers-Diet

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Rhonda Robinson writes on the social, political and parenting issues currently shaping the American family. She lives with her husband and teenage daughter in Middle Tennessee. www.rhondarobinson.me Follow on twitter @amotherslife

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All Comments   (12)
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I'm sorry, this reads like a paid advertisement under the guise of a news story. Very unprofessional.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
All paid advertisements are labeled as such.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I'm a little confused. The Bible is pretty clear that the laws are for Jews only. "You shall give it to the stranger rin your gates and he shall eat it." (Of course, that doesn't mean they are good for you.)
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Sorry - should read: Of course ,that doesn't mean they aren't good for you.

Still the general understanding I always had of it, based on the Rabbis, in "sanctity through limitation"; that by limiting one's use of physical pleasures in certain ways, it enables one to sanctify one's use of the permitted ones.

(Marriage is a great example, although within Judaism there are also limitations within marriage. And no, you can't sanctify same-sex relations, anymore than one could sanctify paganism.)
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Mark 7:19

Acts 10:9-16
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Funny, I can't seem to find a single scientific source that suggests people who keep kosher are unusually healthy.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Historically, the Jews largely escaped the Plague in Europe because of Kosher law. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Death_Jewish_persecutions Treif foods, including shellfish and swine, are scavenger animals. Up until the age of modern medicine (and sometimes still regardless of), these disease carriers brought with them a risk of death upon eating - Hepatitis, etc. It isn't as much of a matter of being "unusually healthy" as it is a matter of not exposing yourself to potential health risk.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
You do know that your wikipedia source itself denies that, right? And that there were lots of Jews who died of the plague, plus that the sources you're citing suggest the difference was the regular housecleaning for Shabbos and the use of the mikvah?

And that bubonic plague isn't transmitted by food -- in fact, the form that led to the major deaths in Europe was the air-transmitted pneumonic form?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Not true, and nonsensical. There are diseases common to treif foods, but bubonic plague isn't one of them. It's spread by fleas carried by rats. It's possible Jewish communities suffered fewer casualties from the plague, but this would likely have been due to higher Jewish standards of cleanliness and Jewish communities being more supportive.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Unfortunately, the most religious woman I know, who lived a 'healthy' lifestyle for 45 years, died of lung cancer within a 3 months of diagnosis. Turns out, people who never smoke, and exercise, etc. are at greater risk of dying because their lungs are so healthy they can tolerate the cancer until a very late stage. She developed no overt symptoms until she was at stage 4. Just a little cough that hung around. That's all. Then she was gone. Healthy lifestyles are no guarantee *at all* if God has other plans. And he often does.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Seems like a good argument for a voluntary scan.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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