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The Dojo: Austin’s Grand Champion of Japanese Cuisine?

New Austin eatery brings Japanese tradition to the heart of Texas.

by
Bryan Preston

Bio

September 13, 2013 - 2:08 pm
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Every American city of any size these days has at least one sushi restaurant. Whether they’re good or not is another question. Even grocery stores carry California and tuna rolls, at least. But deeper modes of Japanese cuisine haven’t made as many inroads across the US. Sushi is ubiquitous, as are Americanized Japanese steakhouses with chefs who quick chop, tell jokes and throw food at you, but try finding good gyudon, tonkatsu or serious ramen outside the country’s more massive cities. Not the Top Ramen you can get six for a buck at HEB, but real hot ramen soup with a pork cutlet floating in its heavy miso or shoyu broth.

The availability of serious Japanese food is growing rapidly in Austin, TX. The city now boasts at least three eateries serving genuine Japanese ramen, the hearty noodle soup loved all over Japan. Ramen Tastsu-Ya in north Austin is the place to go for great ramen fast. Despite the fact that the line to get seated can hang outside the door and run down the walkway in front of the place, you can usually be in and out in about 45 minutes. The ramen is fantastic. Daruma, downtown on Austin’s famous Sixth Street, is a place I haven’t been to but have heard good things about.

dojo2A newcomer, though, intends to be more than just a ramen shop. It seeks to become a neighborhood hangout in the tradition of Japan’s izakayas. It’s called the Dojo, and by the way, it also serves amazing food.

I threw a couple of words at you in that last sentence that probably bear explaining. An izakaya is primarily a drinking spot in Japan, a sake shop, a watering hole. Think Cheers, but on tatami mats. Izakayas are where Japanese workers go to unwind with friends and colleagues after work. They serve food, but the main point of an izakaya is to relax and socialize. Fast food, they are not. They are a place where everyone tends to know everyone else.

A dojo in American thinking is a place where one goes to study martial arts. That’s part but not all of what a dojo is. The word really means “a place of the way,” or a place where a certain way is followed. That’s that I think Austin’s Dojo has in mind. You won’t be swinging wooden swords around, as fun as that might be. But you will absorb a new way of enjoying food and relaxing.

The wait staff will come explain the izakaya concept to you as they seat you. Our waitress, Stacy, explained that at an izakaya diners shouldn’t just order one appetizer, one main course and call it a dinner. Take your time. Order this. Get it. Enjoy it. Order that. Enjoy it. Explore the menu. Talk about the food. Order a couple other things. Enjoy them. Then order the main course. It was perfect advice.

The appetizers are authentically Japanese, with some Western twists, and of the highest quality in presentation and preparation.

dojo-1

The gyoza, kara-age, kewpie shrimp, every appetizer I’ve had at the Dojo, have been top drawer. If you want drinks, they have drinks.

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31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
"An izakaya is primarily a drinking spot in Japan, a sake shop, a watering hole. Think Cheers, but on tatami mats. "

An izakaya is simply a traditional Japanese pub that always has an extensive menu for both food and drinks; it's not just a just a drinking spot like many American bars. Also, almost all izakaya have chairs and tables and counters, as well as tatami.

"They serve food, but the main point of an izakaya is to relax and socialize. "

Wrong; people go to drink and eat their evening meal; the food is just as important as the drinks and socializing.

"They are a place where everyone tends to know everyone else."

Wrong; izakayas are the same as other eateries and bars, in the U.S., Japan or anywhere else - they have regular and non-regular customers, and except for places in little one-horse villages, the most of the people definitely DO NOT know everyone else. Did the author actually spend any time in Japan?


31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
I happen to know that Bryan not only has, but is married to a Japanese woman.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'll be visiting family in Austin in a couple months. Might have to try these places out. See how it compares to the stuff I get in LA. Last time there I seriously considered trying the only Thai place in Marble Falls. I chickened out. Figured the best I could hope for was bad Thai food.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
Takoyaki?
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
No, at least not right now. They do change the menu sometimes. Currently they're serving a tako-wasa but not takoyaki.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
Too bad, I'd think takos would be popular in Austin.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
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