Today’s Morning News Round Up:

Today’s Lead PJM Stories:

Mike McDaniel: The Backwards Trial: Zimmerman Prosecutors Stumble as Defense Wraps Up

Judge Deborah Nelson continues to give the defense worthwhile arguments for appeal, if necessary.

After a Tuesday night that saw her decidedly injudicious rant and her storming off the bench as the defense tried to address her, Wednesday morning arrived with little improvement in Nelson’s temperament. Nelson excluded text messages and tweets from Trayvon Martin’s phone referencing attempts to buy and sell illegal guns, fighting — including at least one message about punching people in the nose and making them bleed, and a large number of messages about Martin’s drug use. In her frantic commentary on admissibility late Tuesday evening, Nelson expressed concern that someone else could have sent the text messages and social media posts made by Martin, so she wasn’t going to allow any of them.

She also ruled that the animated video commissioned by the defense would not be allowed into evidence (the defense can use it in their closing argument, but the jury cannot have it for deliberations). She gave no substantive explanation for her rulings other than to suggest that she read the Lumarque case.

Bridget Johnson: Customs Deal Gives Big Advantage to UAE Over U.S.

Abraham Miller: The BART Strike: A Microcosm of Progressive Power and Policy

Howard Nemerov: Gun Control Mantra: Castle Doctrine Laws Increase Violent Crime

Nicholas Ballasy: Boehner Going to Take ‘Incremental’ Approach on Immigration Without Majority of the Majority

Bill Straub: Senate Dems Determined to Block 20-Week Abortion Limit

Andrew C. McCarthy: Zimmerman Trial: Reversible Error Before We Even Get a Verdict?

Thursday’s PJ Lifestyle Stories:

Charlie Martin: L’affaire Snowden and (Computer) Security

Chris Queen: Who Are Disney’s Most Evil Villains?

Walter Hudson: Star Wars: The Market Strikes Back

Kathy Shaidle: Kinkos Goes To College: University of Iowa Acquires Zine Collection

Hannah Sternberg: Bad Advice for Hobbitses

Morning Reflections…

“Robin’s death made me sad, too, in a seven-year-old way. I was sad to lose my sister and future playmate. I was sad because I saw my parents hurting so much. It would be many years before I could understand the difference between my sorrow and the wrenching pain my parents felt from losing their daughter.” — George W. Bush.

My friend and ancient philosophy research partner Susan L.M Goldberg, who has started a wonderful series on Sundays at PJ Lifestyle dissecting HBO’s Girls through her perspective of Biblical feminism, posted this on my Facebook page yesterday:


This made me laugh. It’s one of those sentiments that’s both true and false at the same time. It’s true in that yes, I do know what I’m doing — I’m doing many things. I’m editing articles, responding to emails, answering phone calls, juggling instant messages, taking care of the dog…. So I guess when I don’t know what I’m doing, when I’m too frazzled from juggling, I can always fall back on whatever it is that counts as “research.”

But what am I researching with all these books and news stories? How American families make war over how they deal with death. Humans have conflicting methods for coping with death. And clever political operatives know how to exploit these divides.

The Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman tragedy has been fueled by a president and his allies in the corporatist media to exploit the American people’s instinctive need to defend their children. Recall how originally the pictures of Martin made him look like an innocent boy. Now in the trial we find the truth, hidden by a judge who does not want Martin’s crime/guns/sex-filled cell phone entered into evidence.

george-zimmerman-on-phone-bloody-head download (2)

And what does the Democrat Party and corporate media’s racial invocation of a dead child distract Americans from uncovering?

Another dead American, his murderers still on the loose, apparently less worthy of concern because he’s not the right age or skin color:



image courtesy shutterstock / Gualberto Becerra