AmazonWarrior

Goddess mentality bears an ancient habit of intertwining the concepts of sex and power.  Take, for instance, the description of Greek goddess Aphrodite:

Aphrodite does not suffer, however, as did the “vulnerable” goddesses. Although she is known for her numerous sexual liaisons, she is not bound by any man. …Unlike the “vulnerable” goddesses–Demeter, Persephone and Hera–Aphrodite was never a victim of a man’s unwanted passion for her; the desires were mutual. …Although an independent figure in her own right, this independence does not preclude emotional involvement with others. On the other hand, she is not attracted to permanent relational bonds like her “vulnerable” sisters.

Often depicted nude, Aphrodite was “born as a nubile, infinitely desirable adult” and held power over love, beauty, and sexual rapture. Adherents would sleep with Aphrodite’s priestesses as an act of worship. Her power lay in her ability to have sex without emotional attachment.

Unlike Aphrodite, the Amazon Women emasculated themselves physically, through the removal of their right breast, as well as mentally and emotionally taking on the traditionally male role of warrior. However, like the Greek goddess, sex remained their primary power:

In some versions of the myth, no men were permitted to have sexual encounters or reside in Amazon country; but once a year, in order to prevent their race from dying out, they visited the Gargareans, a neighboring tribe. The male children who were the result of these visits were either killed, sent back to their fathers or exposed in the wilderness to fend for themselves; the girls were kept and brought up by their mothers, and trained in agricultural pursuits, hunting, and the art of war. In other versions when the Amazons went to war they would not kill all the men. Some they would take as slaves, and once or twice a year they would have sex with their slaves.

It should come as no surprise then that a building block of goddess feminism is the idea that power derives from sex through gender, physical form, and intercourse, as expressed in a number of modern feminist venues. Contemporary pagan goddess ritual revolves around the intertwining of power and sex, often tying the two together in ceremony through nudity as well as actual intercourse:

In the Wiccan ritual of the Great Rite, a priest-ess would embody the energy of the receptive, nurturing lunar Goddess while a priest would take on the role of the active, vital solar God. By inserting a blade into a cup, or by engaging in heterosexual intercourse (usually in private), celebrants would enact a pri-mal, erotic union of active and receptive forces that mirrored and participated in the ongoing creation of the universe. This sexual polarity was seen as essential for worship and for performing ‘‘magic,’’ a ritual practice intended to create positive changes in consciousness and in the physical world. As an expression of both freedom and sensuality, most Wiccan rituals were performed skyclad, or ritually nude.

While even the most radical of feminist political subcultures clings to a worldview grounded in sex-based authority with claims including, “Radical feminists believe gender roles are harmful to women. We seek freedom from ‘femininity’ and ‘masculinity.’ Gender only exists for the benefit of men, as a class, at the expense of women, as a class.” Ironically, these “RadFems” echo the Amazons, seeking to escape these perceived gender boundaries by embracing the physicality of the opposite sex, an act that only serves to reaffirm the idea that power is defined through sexual terms.