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German law bans homeschooling, as the country doesn’t want to have religious and philosophical minorities within the country. In other words, they don’t want to have people think differently than the government.

More telling is their insistence that the government has first rights when it comes to the indoctrination of children. Parents that attempt to usurp that authority by imparting their faith through homeschooling risk losing their family.

In sharp contrast, America has traditionally held the parents responsible for the education of their children. Early in the twentieth century, with fears of immigration impacting society, this fundamental principal was challenged — and upheld.

The U.S. Supreme Court stated:

“…the child is not the mere creature of the State; those who nurture him and direct his destiny have the right, coupled with the high duty, to recognize and prepare him for additional obligations.” Pierce v. Society of Sisters, 268 U.S. 510(1925).

In the U.S., an estimated 2 million children are legally homeschooled and enjoying this right. And like the Romeike family, they ask nothing from the state other than to be left alone.

So what could possibly be the administration’s motive for singling out this family for deportation?