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Abraham, Part 1: Are ‘Secular Israelis’ Really Secular?

Or does the biblical patriarch offer a “religious” prototype?

by
P. David Hornik

Bio

April 21, 2013 - 7:00 am

Soon after Abraham enters Canaan, the leitmotif makes a brief appearance when God tells him: “Unto thy seed will I give this land.”

Abraham’s response:

and there builded he an altar unto the LORD, who appeared unto him.

And he removed from thence unto a mountain on the east of Bethel, and pitched his tent, having Bethel on the west, and Hai on the east: and there he builded an altar unto the LORD, and called upon the name of the LORD.

In this and a similar case later in Genesis where God speaks to him and Abraham responds by building an altar, what is notable is that Abraham’s reaction is spontaneous and unmediated. The Jewish religion has not yet emerged; there are no synagogues, no common prayers and rituals for Abraham to follow. He answers God on the spot, in the way he knows.

Again, it reminds me of the “secular Israelis” of today — many of whom go to synagogue rarely or even never, but whom I often hear addressing God (Elohim) in various emotional modalities. Or, in a different form of the phenomenon, a song based on Psalm 121 has recently become a major hit and anthem in Israel; you can see it here with close to half a million views.

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All Comments   (21)
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Mr. Hornik: I'm bit of pendant on the distinction between Jew (or Judean) and Israelite. Much of what happens in the Hebrew Bible, up until the destruction of the Israelite state in 720 BCE, is about Israel. There are no Jewish people to speak at that point. After 720, Judea does becomes the remnant of Israel that remains in existence and continues the Israelite experience. Despite the destruction of the Judean state in 587 BCE, the Judeans continued the traditions established earlier. When they returned in 530 BCE to the Persian province of Yahud they began a long journey that established the Judaism we know today the Jewish of people of today (the descendants of the Judeans). There is of course a continuous link from the proto-Israelite Abraham to the Jews of today, but it is wrong to label Abraham the first Jew. He could though be labeled the first Israelite.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
From an early age I learned from sermons and in Sunday school that Abraham, Joseph and Moses (to name my favorites) were heroes. These men were faithful to God, and they were courageous, and they practiced the universal moral code. Jesus can be seen in the same vein (taken to the nth degree by a Christian), God's faithful, courageous and moral man.

To this day I find myself feeling a strong brotherhood for Jews - the race of people chosen by God to establish the universal moral code (love your neighbor as yourself - do unto others as you would have them do to you) and to bring forth His Son as the final path back to God and eternal life. Bless you. Mission accomplished. Now I wonder - what next?

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Mission is never accomplished--Israel will continue to be a dynamo contributing all kinds of things to the world in a wide variety of fields.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The greatest things often come in small packages. God speed.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
As an Goy, I tend to see Judaism in light of the story in Numbers where some gentleman is murdered by stoning, so as not to shed is blood, and hence gain guilt for untimely twig gathering.

This same murder for solidarity is what fuels Islam now and Christianity from time to time in the past. Tolerance only comes when people turn their back on the murderous parts of their faith.

Such self-congratulation is a bit gauche, to me at least, and I believe that Israel is trying to survive on the false premise that it can cut deals with it enemies by good faith negotiation.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Are you talking Crusades? That was Christendom driving out the islamic hordes that had invaded them. The Inquisition? Again, that was to drive out islam (although Jews got caught up in that one).

Sp - besides Christians trying to keep from being murdered by islam, what exactly do you have against us?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The problem is, and I can only speak as a Christian, people without faith in the entire 20th century murdered on a mass scale never seen before in human history.

For instance, you could take the most egregious, murderous sins in the name of Christianity which is the Spanish Inquisition, compare it to 20th century atheistic states, and atheistic states would be 18,300,000% more likely to commit mass murder.

So obviously the lack of faith by itself doesn't lead to tolerance, and in fact by sheer number the lack of faith seems to lead to the worst forms of intolerance - even when compared to Islam.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I appreciate the thoughtful article being given top billing one again.
My own conclusions on the religious practice of less observant Israeli Jews and their obvious ingrained adherence to Judaism comes from two other Torah based concepts.
The first was the acceptance of The Torah at Sinai by the entire Jewish nation with the declaration that " we will do and we will hear". The other Torah concept is the understanding that living in Israel is a greater mitzva than all the other mitzvot combined .
In a sense all Israelis are in fact " doing " while the " hearing " ( understanding ) will come later.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The main characteristic of Abraham was left out of this article. He followed not the Law because it had yet to be written. He followed God and that "by faith".
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Interesting article. Thank you for providing this.

I am happy to see apparently there a number of very bright Jews pondering what exactly does it mean to refer to one's self as Jewish. Because it is a very important personal question that each Jew must answer, whether they intend to or not. I have questioned a few "secular" Jews here on the very subject - myself not Jewish.

But I would place the land of present day Israel not in the days of dividing between Abraham or Moses, but more inclined toward the days of Kings.

And I believe with all my heart that is why Israel, for all of its miraculous accomplishments and dare I say supernaturally inspired accomplishments, though she will survive and even thrive to varying degrees, will continue to struggle with this irrational, global hatred of Jews that weighs on every Jew - both the secular and the religious.

If I could quote my favorite Jewish prophet when he issued this challenge, because I find it as relevant today as 2,700 years ago:

“How long will you hesitate between two opinions? If the Lord is God, follow Him; but if Baal, follow Him."

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I would think that a Jew who does not believe in God is no longer a Jew ...
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Ed Koch wrote, a few years ago, something like the following:

A man is a Jew first by birth and then by observance. If he ceases to observe the Jewish religion, he remains a Jew by birth. If he doubts this, he should ask his neighbors, who will remind him.

One of the early Zionists, in the years preceding the Holocaust, put it even more bluntly: "Who is a Jew? A Jew is a man whom other men call a Jew." In the context of WWII, that viewpoint is tragically accurate.

It is commonly known that a Jew, according to Judaism, is the child of a Jewish mother (or one who has embraced Judaism as a convert). But Israel's Law of Return, which grants automatic Israeli citizenship to Jews, uses a different standard, which is at least one Jewish grandparent. This standard, which has remained unchanged since the 1940s, is a dramatic and eloquent statement -- if you were Jewish enough to be persecuted by the Nazis, you're Jewish enough for us.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
By most accounts Israel's first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion, and its fourth prime minister, Golda Meir, were atheists. They both came from a socialist movement. Ben-Gurion in particular was steeped in the Bible, but seems to have related to it secularly. In any case, their Jewish status is not in question.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Nobody has the authority to say what the minimum requirements are to count as a Jew.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
So all Arab Muslims have to do is claim that they are Jews and they will be granted Israeli citizenship under the Law of Return. Who are the Israeli government to decide who is a Jew?

Lets not forget Jews for Jesus, which are currently denied such treatment under the law. They dont pass the Jew test according to the State of Israel. Though they claim to be Jews.

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Yet you seem quite comfortable taking upon yourself the authority to declare that nobody has the right to decide. Just how steeped in biblical
scholarship are you?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Someone has to have that authority, no? Otherwise the designation loses all meaning.

However, that "someone" isn't Calatrava, and his/her definition indeed won't wash. A Jew, by the traditional Jewish definition, is someone whose mother is Jewish, or who converted in accordance with Jewish law. Or to put it differently, to be a Jew, either the person him/herself or a direct maternal ancestress has to have made the wholehearted declaration (as at Sinai) "naaseh v'nishma" - we will do [what G-d commands - unconditionally], and we will [afterwards make our best attempt to logically] understand it.

Once that "naaseh v'nishma" has been, so to speak, imprinted on one's spiritual X chromosome, then his or her observance or lack thereof - or belief in G-d or lack thereof - can in no way affect the identity of the soul, just its growth and development.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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