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Jobs Are for Suckers: How to Be the Boss of You

Don't do 20th century stuff to get a 21st century life.

by
Kathy Shaidle

Bio

April 16, 2013 - 7:00 am

I thought back to my early twenties, when I was starting out as a writer.

Multiply $84,000 times three and you get just over a quarter of a million dollars.

Given the 17% interest rates of the 1980s, I could have stuck that amount in a 5-year term deposit and lived off the interest, by which time I’d have been well established in my career anyhow, thanks to diligent freelancing and whatnot.

What are kids these days thinking?

Look: if you absolutely positively need a degree — to do all those doctorin’ jobs and lawyerin’ jobs — I get it.

(Well, not the “lawyerin’ jobs” so much. We’ve had too many lawyers for a very long time.)

But as I’ve been saying long before the phrase “college bubble” was coined:

If you’re a budding entrepreneur, college is a waste of time and money, because unless you want a “straight” job, you don’t need a B.A.

And I question that “need.” It’s just lazy H.R. nonsense.

As it occurs to society at large that most bachelor’s degrees are useless, very slowly this asinine requirement will be phased out.

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Top Rated Comments   
I was married with two babies by the time I was 20. When both my kids were in school I started working in sales and that's what I've done for the last thirty years in various industries. I love sales because you can make as much as you want and if you're a top producer your boss treats you well and stays out of your way.

The most college I've had is a desultory semester or two of the JC variety. I realized long ago that avid curiosity and a voracious appetite for reading literature and history cost nothing and would serve me better than indoctrination by leftist professors. My lack of a degree has never prevented me from getting any job I've ever applied for.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (19)
All Comments   (19)
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The primary purpose of high tuitions at prestige universities is to keep the "undesirables" out - that is, people who aren't from the power elite and who might harbor ideas the ruling elite dislike.

University is where the power elite credential their children, alongside a handful of cherry-picked, politically acceptable, ambitious outsiders (see: Barack Obama) for street cred and who could provide coattails for the rich kids to ride on. Degrees from these places are modern titles of nobility.

The best proof is the fact that all of these elite universities have HUGE endowment funds. They could easily charge minimal tuition, or even $0.00 tuition out if the endowment profits alone. But they don't. They don't pay taxes on it either. It's just for empire building.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I learned a great deal more about economics while wearing the chicken hat (KFC) than I learned in many classroooms.

I can't imagine where an important portion of my moral growth and comprehension of civic and cultural life would have come from without a series of fast food and other so-called menial labor jobs.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
and what exactly is that person getting for indoctrination???????

How about internship and apprentice programs, and then at least the journalistic source would know what they are getting or would cut the person and cut the losses early
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
It would make more sense for industries and other hiring agencies to administer a good intelligence and competency test to applicants. At least they would know whether potential employees have any abilities at all. It would be more accurate than a credential from inflated educational institutions and help they find better and smarter employees.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
It's strange how many jobs require a BA/BS in ANYTHING just to get hired. Our local law enforcement agency is a case in point. If you don't have military service, you must have a degree--it doesn't matter the subject. It's the new high school diploma.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Degrees, initially associate and then baccalaureate degrees have been around in California for a long time. LEO have a sworn responsiblity to enforce the vehicle codes, the criminal codes, the health and welfare codes and business codes of the state and the federal government. Then they have to have a keen knowledge of the judicial system requirements in investigating and prosecuting a case successfully according to the precise legislated elements of a crime. Being a truly professional LEO requires a great deal of multi disciplined academics and broad life skills. That said, I make no claim that all are qulified to that standard.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
These days a BA or BS is more like a high school diploma. It shows that you are literate, numerate, have a degree or persistence, and have some basic problem solving skill - about what a high school diploma used to demonstrate.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I have a friend who graduated High School despite the fact that he was barely literate (2nd to 3rd grade reading level), couldn't do basic math, and had little to no understanding of science, history, etc. With graduates like that, it reduces a high school degree to little more than a "participation award".
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
"Participation award" describes most of what happens at California's state universities and community colleges outside of the STEM courses.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
well participation reward is what libs/dems/low information people are about, and that Pee-C BS of wanting to give self esteem and demand nothing in the way of people earning it.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
We have become a nation overloaded with college educated(?) people in social sciences and humanities. In nearly every higher education model of classifications those academic areas are considered "soft" disciplines. Applied fields tend to be more concerned with application of knowledge, such as law, education, and engineering. Pure fields are those that are viewed more, as less concerned with practical application, such as mathematics, history, and philosophy. Life systems include such fields as biology and agriculture, while languages and mathematics exemplify nonlife disciplines.

Most college bound go looking for the easy route a a sheepskin with no consideration to their lifes contribution to society or the economic structures. Thats also their approach to their future adulthood, careers and employment. Two things are common rationale in obtaining a sheepskin. 1) Society owes them automatic entrance into jobs, high pay and social status. 2) A sheepskin protects them from menial jobs of hard labor. That is afterall, their centric reasoning for going to college and racking up high amounts of education debt.

Where do these young people learn these kinds of rationale? Parents? Educators? Their religious environment?

Today, unlike past generations, it takes far more than a idea and disciplined life skills to start and advance a successful business enterprise that contributes to the nations interest of economic sustainability -- unless you have wealthy parents, friends or an inheritance. Otherwise you start out with layers of debt liability from the start and grossly underfunded for startup and sustainability.

As a result, most of the young, educated or not, are subjects in the same greater labor pool of unemployed, contending for jobs they're not willing to do or otherwise have no passion or academic education for.

A national society that finds consumer debt at $1 trillion dollars and rising and another $1 trillion dollars in education debt and rising with a collapsed economy and unemployment running high well into the future -- well, it says alot and we havent' even touched on the mortage debt of unaffordable homes by the young unstable population.

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
There are many smaller colleges and universities that have good financial aid and scholarship programs that even not very academic or not very sporty students can qualify for. Many smaller schools still teach traditional values and curricula untarnished by progressive agendas and political correctness. If someone wants a formal education, it will still be expensive to go to smaller schools, but not prohibitively so. If you want a university name for a resumé, that you'll have to pay for. Everything that a university teaches can be found in libraries and on the internet—with drive and ambition, you can skip college and still be successful.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The line said that it was a link to amputee related sites, per the Wounded Warrior Project, of which I am a contributor. Please fix this.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I was married with two babies by the time I was 20. When both my kids were in school I started working in sales and that's what I've done for the last thirty years in various industries. I love sales because you can make as much as you want and if you're a top producer your boss treats you well and stays out of your way.

The most college I've had is a desultory semester or two of the JC variety. I realized long ago that avid curiosity and a voracious appetite for reading literature and history cost nothing and would serve me better than indoctrination by leftist professors. My lack of a degree has never prevented me from getting any job I've ever applied for.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
From one Sheridan College flunkie to another....great column. We already know that everything cool that was ever made was created by nonconformists. Prime example: Ford Mustang. Another example, Sheridan dropout John Kricfalusi was the creator of the iconic Ren & Stimpy.

The author of open letter to the Ivy League universities is going to have a rough road ahead of her. She's way too smart for her own good.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
"everything cool that was ever made was created by nonconformists"

Counterexample: The US Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo space programs.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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