Get PJ Media on your Apple

PJM Lifestyle

4 Reasons Why the Electric Car Isn’t Ready for the American Driver

The automobile of the future is not ready for the consumer who demands freedom.

by
Becky Graebner

Bio

April 5, 2013 - 1:30 pm

2. It needs more stops than your toddler in potty-training.

Batteries die. They have limited capacity and need to be charged. C’est la vie.

The Tesla Model S comes in three flavors of electric motor: 85 kW-h (265 mi range), 60 kW-h (200 mi range), and 40 kW-h (140 mi range). (*Note, these “mileage ranges” come from EPA’s 5-cycle tests). Compared to the average sedan, such as the ever-popular 2013 Honda Accord (3.5 L, 6-cyl, Auto 6-spd), which has a projected “25 MPG combined” (so, approximately 430 miles/tank), the EV Model S is a bit below in mileage capabilities.  Not horrible—but lacking.

The current lack of charging stations in this country, compounded by the requirement that they exist within 200 miles of each other, everywhere in the 3,794,000 sq. miles of the continental United States, makes charging even one of the longest-range EVs available an annoying requirement and a dangerous gamble. If you are unable to afford a Tesla, which has the longer-range batteries on the market, then your EV will most likely need charging stations every 75-100 miles. Pathetic. Can you imagine stopping every hour and a half to charge the car…maybe even more frequently?  Stock prices for “Charleston Chew” are going to skyrocket from such frequent “battery stops” along the freeways.  Electric cars need batteries that go at least as far as gas-powered cars… otherwise, what’s the advantage of buying them if you can’t drive them more than a few miles?  And don’t say “because they are green” — because the electricity that would be required to charge these EVs every one-hundred miles isn’t magical and 100% environmentally friendly either. It has to come from somewhere — whether it be wind or coal. The less often electric cars need to charge, the better — for the driver’s sanity and the environment.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (39)
All Comments   (39)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
The 11 miles quoted for the Prius is by design. The electric motors in the Synergy drivetrain are there primarily to assist during acceleration. Electric only capability was added later with the plug-in models to appeal to those who drove short distances each day. The real costs of an electric or hybrid are hidden as most are sold at a loss or at cost. Batteries simply do not have the energy density of gasoline and will not for decades.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Hooray for an article that gives "just the facts, ma'am." Everything said is right on the money. Another thing struck me as i read it. I am not a scientist, but I recall the law of Conservation of Matter and Energy. Is it, somehow, less polluting to generate the unimaginable amounts of electricity with huge power plants, powered by that "dirty" coal, than it is to produce gasoline that allows us to drive the cars we wish to drive? Electric cars! What a stupid vanity trip for the Liberal Socialist Left!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
"When we solve the storage problem the electric car will be the future car" Thomas Edison said something close to that in 1890. 123 years later and we are still not there. Electric cars have been around for that long (the Baker?)I do not mind if they make them just don't charge me for your toy or it's needed charging stations. Can you imagine the size of a station that would remove the bohemoth battery then install a "charged" one. One of those every 100 miles, yea thats "Green" living.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
You are right that this is another problem but one that can be solved with underground storage just like gasoline tanks. I am not a fan of EV. Petroleum is a gift from mother nature - highly concentrated energy, easily and safely transportable and and efficiently converted into useful work with technology like the combustion engine. Enviro-wackos do not see the big picture. My point is that if you are going to insist on EVs, at least try to do it in a way that has a chance of succeeding.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The entire EV industry made one big fatal strategic mistake in conceptualizing. They needed to think of the battery pack as part of the fuel delivery system and not as part of the car. Imagine pulling into the next generation "gas" station with your EV, entering the battery exchange lane where an hydraulic apparatus racks out your exhausted pack and racks in a fresh pack and sends you on your way. Just having a prototype of one of these stations in San Luis Obispo would have sold thousands more Teslas and Fiskers in LA and SF.

I mean really, did anyone even do any modelling of how big a charging station would have to be in a heavily traveled corridor like the New Jersey turnpike if had to collect and hold 4 hours of refueling traffic?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I don't support electric cars at all. I AM all for natural gas cars. The buses in my area all run on this stuff and they're great! The infrastructure is already in place and just needs to be modified - as well as the combustion engine of cars. If they can do it with diesel engines they can with regular autos.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
A comment on the subject of the recent battery fires aboard Dreamliner
aircraft changed my mind about pure electric automobiles;
'The more efficient a battery becomes, the more it resembles a bomb.'

The IC engine is hard to beat for most automotive applications, with
one exception, the Big City - Suburb commute, and even there the
alternative solution includes a rental fleet of standardized vehicles
which generate extra revenue during the day, and a large number
of fueling (or charging) stations, powered by a pocket nuke;
Light rail without the rails.


1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The only electric vehicles that appeal to me cost as much as a Corvette or Viper. The only electric cars produced for the masses couldn't get me to my doctor's offices and back on one charge. They are useless.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I find it interesting that most of the places which are most convenient for electric car owners—places with charging stations, stores and entertainment and work all in short driving distances—are also places with LPG or electric mass transit, the greenest of options for travel at this time.
I live in a city now, but have lived where the closest grocery store was nearly an hour away, even with 60+ mph highways. I live in a city now, but my parents live 200 miles away in the country. Do I rent a car every time I see them? Electric cars hold a lot of promise, but for now, it's only promises.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Current electrics are useless in a rural state like mine. One city to the next can be 50 to 100 miles easily.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
$50k golf carts belong on the swanky golf courses and country clubs around the country not on our streets
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
1 2 3 Next View All