Here’s a ProTip™: leave your firearm in the case until you arrive at the firing line, and control the muzzle at all times. Of course, since the family didn’t case their weapons, Carson immediately muzzles his mother’s feet once they get to range, and while the camera crew didn’t catch it in their shot, their instructor noted that some of the firearms were loaded when they hit the range.

This family doesn’t have the most basic of safety rules down, and I hope that the instructor takes the time off camera to pull Brad and Krystal aside and explain that they are on the fast track to a negligent discharge that could wound or kill someone, and that it is their responsibility as parents to learn the basic safety rules and impart them to their kids. As it stands now, they’d get reamed by every line boss and range safety officer I’ve ever known, and they’d be lucky if they were allowed to ever come back.

Brad and Krystal then buy a 10′x30′ underground bunker, which they bring into their suburban backyard, swinging it over the fence and trees in broad daylight with passers-by gawking, to bury in their backyard.

Head. Desk.

The more I read about prepping, the more I realize that surviving a disaster in any urban or suburban area is as much (perhaps more) about building relationships than stockpiling supplies. There is no mention whatsoever of this family working in conjunction with their neighbors to establish relationships or a plan.

This $50,000 purchase isn’t a refuge. If the worst does happen, it’s a target, and eventually a tomb.

Despite spending $70,000 in prepping, the show’s experts from Practical Preppers gives the family four months of survival time. They’re being very generous. Unless they include their neighbors in their plans, I’d estimate their survival time in weeks.