Get PJ Media on your Apple

PJM Lifestyle

Rock Bottom: Die Hard 5 at Direct-to-DVD Level

It's time to take this franchise behind the barn and shoot it. Yippee ki-yay.

by
John Boot

Bio

February 14, 2013 - 11:00 am
<- Prev  Page 2 of 2   View as Single Page
YouTube Preview Image

Bam. Pow. Boom. The three-way chase is long (nearly 20 minutes), and it’s certainly loud, with plenty of crunching steel and squealing tires, but thanks to sloppy editing and a lack of urgency in the story (far from being terrified of the villains, we barely know who they are, plus John McC doesn’t even belong here) it’s about as dramatically affecting as a demolition derby. The director, John Moore, is an undistinguished journeyman (his credits include the remake of Flight of the Phoenix, the remake of The Omen and Max Payne), which is a nice way of saying he’s a talentless hack.

The choices of such inexplicable mediocrities as Courtney and Moore to be costar and director in an installment of one of Twentieth Century Fox’s proudest franchises scream “cost-cutting move,” and yet the rest of the movie is if anything even worse than the so-so chase scene. John and Jack spend the movie bitching at each other, tossing out brainless one-liners (Willis repeats the “Yippee ki-yay” line one more time, in a pitiable play for the nostalgia vote) and gradually learning to work together as they shepherd Komarov through a series of attacks. As it turns out, the “file” everyone has been after gets forgotten, and the ultimate goal turns out to be… what it always turns out to be: protecting a stash of enriched uranium.

The climax, set at night in an industrial wasteland that looks like New Jersey’s worst nightmare, is eyeball-scorchingly unattractive, eardrum-puncturingly loud and mindlessly dull, as John and Jack face off against the mob’s sexiest killing machine Irina (Yuliya Snigir), who tries to take everyone out with a helicopter. Mountains of ammo are expended by each side, but as Willis dashes around cracking wise, there’s no sense of him actually outsmarting the villains as in the sanctified original Die Hard 25 years ago. Instead, he just seems lucky and indestructible, ducking under gunfire and effortlessly pulling off feats of physical fitness that don’t look terribly likely for a man Willis’s age. The thrills in this scene and in this movie are, as a result, nonexistent: It all just seems tired and absurd. A Good Day to Die Hard is a good way to die of boredom.

****

More recent reviews from John Boot:

Steven Soderbergh’s Strange Swan Song

With Django Unchained, Is QT Devolving Into the Weird Al Yankovic of Cinema?

Sean Penn Embarrasses Himself in Over-Acted Gangster Squad

<- Prev  Page 2 of 2   View as Single Page
John Boot is the pen name of a conservative writer operating under deep cover in the liberal media.
Click here to view the 26 legacy comments

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (4)
All Comments   (4)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
Why has PJMedia upped the quantity of fluffy movie reviews and articles about cats v. dogs? Just in the last few weeks, I find less and less solid political and cultural analysis, and more articles like this - not badly written, but I can read this sort of article in a dozen other places on the Interwebs. PJM was unique in that people like Richard Fernandez and VDH were just two of a crowd of similarly gifted and insightful writers.

Now, it seems more and more like Yahoo's news feed. I blame Obama, just because.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Loved it, but then, I love Willis. Theatre was full, too. Go, Bruce!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
For a movie that's supposed to be a real stinkeroo, it sure raked in a boatload of cash at the box office in just a few days. Both Arnold Swarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone released shoot-em-up action flicks last week, and they both bombed miserably. Nobody would pay to see them, probably because both actors publicly came out in favor of gun control. Willis, on the other hand, publicly came out in favor of the Second Amendment. He's an actor who is smart enough not to alienate his fans with liberal talking points. A brilliant marketing strategy, and it payed off for him. Very well played, Mr. Willis. I am definitely going to go see that flick.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
What? You were expecting Hamlet?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
View All