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Allah, Odin, and Thor: Mythical Gods of War, Not of Love

Brian James' novel Ragnarok brings the brutality of the Viking Apocalypse to the modern world.

by
David Forsmark

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February 3, 2013 - 7:00 am

As Nonie Darwish writes in her seminal books Now They Call me Infidel and Cruel and Usual Punishment: The Terrifying Global Implications of Islamic Law, the notion of a loving Father God who oversees a brotherhood of men is something she never encountered until she immigrated to the West. It is a Christian concept that Muslims adopt when living in Western cultures in order to fit in, or because they aren’t particularly informed about their religion in the first place (and want to fit in).

Perhaps because the Quran gives lip service to Jesus, or because of its Middle East origins, or because, quite coincidentally, the main ethnic group that follows Islam is also descended from Abraham, many act as though Islam is somehow related to the Judeo/Christian tradition, however distantly.

But Allah is much more like every other pagan deity… no matter how far flung.

I talked to PJ Media contributor Brian Cherry who, under the pseudonym Brian James, has recently published Ragnarok: The Hammer, Book One in a planned trilogy of novels set in the present day about the Norse prophecies of Apocalypse — hey, unlike the Mayans, the Vikings actually predicted one, you don’t have to infer it by when they calendar happens to end.

Since the end of any religion is one’s eternal destiny, we started there. Brian told me that Odin and Allah agree on the surest — and quickest — way to heaven. Not through faith in a Savior, but through sanctified violence.

Although I’m sure the original myths many of Odin’s circumstances are borrowed directly from the bible, his personality is much closer to that of Allah. The first thing that comes to mind is that he would have loved suicide bombers.

Those who went to Valhalla didn’t go there based on a belief in a savior, enlightenment or good works. You went to Valhalla based on a good death in battle. Odin would have adored warriors who killed thousands of their enemy by crashing an airliner into a building. Dying during the act would have assured their place in heaven.

Doing god’s work

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I know that I hung on Yggdrasil
For nine nights long
Wounded by spear
Consecrated to Oðin
Myself a sacrifice to myself
Upon that tree
The wisest know not the roots
of ancient times whence it sprang.

None brought me bread
None gave me mead
Down to the depths I searched
I took up the Runes
Raised them with song
And from that tree I fell.

Runes you shall know, and readable staves,
Very powerful staves,Very great staves
Graven by the mighty one who speaks
Carved by the highest hosts

Oðin among the Aesir,
Dvalin (sleeper) among dwarfs,
Dáin (dead) among alfs,
Alvitter (all-knowing) among etins,
I myself carved some for mankind

The following are not recomendations, Alfather commands you to know the following if you are Ásatrúar.

Know how to carve, know how to read,
know how to stain, know how to understand,
know how to ask, know how to offer,
know how to evoke, know how to sacrifice.

Know you not what a true god is!
For you worship the bringer of lies, and death! Cult of Loki! Banish thee to Helheim!

http://medievalnews.blogspot.com/2010/01/viking-attacks-on-europe-were-self.html

tell me now who is a god of war!?

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