Although I believe that we Christians may have good-faith disagreements about what our obligations are as we try to stand up for our beliefs, that doesn’t mean we can take any position we like and call it “Christianity.” For example, it’s quite understandable that there might be Christians who disagree about whether we should go to war or if we have an obligation to give personal charity or demand that the government give it on our behalf. However, just because there might be a few places where Christians disagree with each other, that doesn’t mean there are infinite numbers of interpretations of our beliefs. If there were, calling yourself a Christian would be as meaningless as calling yourself “fair” or “nice.”

Because we’re flawed human beings, we Christians may engage in adultery, but that doesn’t mean it ceases to be a sin. A Christian may lie to try to get someone he doesn’t like in trouble, but that doesn’t mean that he hasn’t gone astray. The problem we’ve begun to see with Christianity is that when our beliefs conflict with the values of the world, instead of admitting our sins, we’ve simply started to call the wrong things right because it’s easier. Instead of having the courage to stand up for Christianity, most Christians have decided they’d rather be in conflict with God than with their pushy neighbor, some jerk on the Internet, or what they’re seeing on their TV screen.

This starts with the cowardice of Christian pastors all around our country. Many of them bend over so far backward not to offend anyone that they’re no longer standing shoulder-to-shoulder with God. If even pastors aren’t willing to stand up for Christianity, then it’s no surprise that their flocks aren’t showing much courage either. It’s also not shocking that so many younger Americans are looking at Christians today and deciding that our faith isn’t for them. As it says in Revelation 3:16, “So, because you are lukewarm–neither hot nor cold–I am about to spit you out of my mouth.” If we Christians are lukewarm and don’t have the courage of our convictions, then we can’t expect lost people looking for something to believe in to join us.

This is not radicalism, it’s what used to be the default position for Christians. If you say you believe in Jesus Christ, but your beliefs crumple on impact each time they conflict with the world, then you’re not a Christian in anything other than name. I may be a sinner, a hypocrite, and far from perfect, but I am at least willing to take a stand for Christianity and what we Christians believe. Sadly, our country and our faith have degenerated so much over the past few decades that even that now qualifies as social conservatism.

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More on God and religion at PJ Lifestyle:

When Is a Religion not a Religion? 

The Waiting for ‘Superman’ of the New Atheists

5 Reasons Why This Pagan Won’t Vote for Barack Obama

‘The World is Against the Christian Man.’

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