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23 Books for Counterculture Conservatives, Tea Party Occultists, and Capitalist Wizards

We are a nation created by generations of religious whack-jobs who just wanted to live strangely, create stuff, and be left alone! Version 1.0

by
Dave Swindle

Bio

October 20, 2012 - 3:00 pm
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Part III: Polemics

7. The Slaves Shall Serve: Meditations on Liberty by James Wasserman

Publication Date: February 1, 2004
Official Description:

A battle is raging for the soul of America, and it is of critical interest to the survival of freedom worldwide. Our nation is surrendering its fundamental values of individual responsibility and self determination. Domestically we exchange our privacy and autonomy for the chimera of security; internationally we abdicate our ability to act in our national interest. Why are we squandering the precious jewels of the greatest political experiment in human history? What actions can thoughtful citizens take to protect and regain their personal freedoms? This important collection of essays is supplemented by lengthy appendices containing the primary reference materials that underlie the author’s bold assertions. Readers will fearlessly explore the modern plague of collectivism, especially as embodied by the United Nations; learn the true political, historical, and spiritual roots of the September 11th attacks; revisit the Waco massacre without averting their glance; witness the cynical manipulations of the civilian disarmament movement; and be invited to contemplate the role of transcendent values in the battle to preserve and maintain freedom.

Why Tea Party Occultists Should Read It:

This engaging companion to The Templars and the Assassins features seven essays from Wasserman integrating his occult spirituality with his political conservatism. The subjects covered include an explanation of his own transition from Left to Right, a summary of ideological struggles over the past 300 years, a non-crackpot analysis of what the Clinton administration did at Waco in 1993 (worth reconsidering in these days of Fast and Furious), 9/11 remembered, gun rights, and the need for belief in transcendent values. One hundred pages of three appendices support the essays — the full text of the Declaration, Constitution, and Bill of Rights juxtaposed with the UN Charter, Convention on Human Rights, and other documents. Wasserman annotates, pointing out the key differences.

Also included is Liber Oz, which Wasserman describes as, “a statement published by the English master Aleister Crowley during World War II,” and which “presents what I consider to be the ideal statement of the political rights of any individual courageous enough to live up to the responsibilities that freedom entails.”

Future editions of this list will include more books by and about Crowley. The Templar heretics of the Middle Ages unified the mystical traditions of Paganism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Crowley took over where they left off, integrating the Renaissance traditions, Eastern mysticism and science into his own system of Scientific Illuminism which operated under the motto, “Our method is science, our aim is religion.”

We can use the scientific method to see which religious rituals work to accomplish their objective of making us better, happier, stronger, smarter, more Godly people. No religion has a monopoly on effective rituals.

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