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The Porn You Will Always Have With You: California’s Condom Cops

Why do gay activists care about what happens during straight porn shoots?

by
Kathy Shaidle

Bio

March 13, 2012 - 12:05 am
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Rule 34 is bunk.

You know that rule of the internet: “If it exists, there is porn of it”?

Wrong.

One, because if there were “cellulite porn,” I might very well be typing this beside my infinity pool in a double gated community somewhere south of the 49th parallel.

(Who am I kidding? I wouldn’t be typing this at all…)

Two: last year I asked my blog readers if they’d ever heard tell of “Mountie porn,” and got one measly link to a low-rent “sexy Halloween costume” vendor.

Which seems bizarre, and not just because all those chicks dug Due South.

After all, uniforms have been a porn staple forever. As P.J. O’Rourke famously said:

I have often been called a Nazi, and, although it is unfair, I don’t let it bother me. I don’t let it bother me for one simple reason. No one has ever had a fantasy about being tied to a bed and sexually ravished by someone dressed as a liberal.

Yep, that Hugo Boss guy has a LOT to answer for:

It was one of Israel’s dirty little secrets. In the early 1960s, as Israelis were being exposed for the first time to the shocking testimonies of Holocaust survivors at the trial of Adolf Eichmann, a series of pornographic pocket books called Stalags, based on Nazi themes, became best sellers throughout the land.

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Now while I wouldn’t call them fascists, our RCMP has burned a few barns in their day.

(And tasered a guy to death for having a nicotine fit at the airport. Then there was the time they stole all that dynamite…)

So: pretty badass. But still (almost) no Mountie porn. Hmmm.

All this to say:

My attitude about pornography is as subjectively personal as anyone else’s.

In my case, it reflects my experiences as a Canadian female of a certain age, steeped in the anti- and pro-porn “wars” that preoccupied feminists in the 1980s.

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