Get PJ Media on your Apple

PJM Lifestyle

by
Megan Fox

Bio

March 7, 2012 - 11:59 pm

3. The indulgent sideline screamer

There is a tendency with Attachment Parenting to put the desires and feelings of your child ahead of all else. With proper application, Attachment Parenting should not lead to child-indulgence but let’s be honest, no one has time to read after the baby arrives. So it’s possible that a lot of parents stopped reading after the infant stage. We are told that every noise our babies make deserves a response and that our schedules should center around their needs and wants, and with an infant much of that is necessary since they cannot communicate.

But these habits must change as our children get older or there will be the devil to deal with in a few years. You know the kid as well as I do. He pushes babies, he takes toys, he has tantrums in stores, and all the while his mom makes excuses. Soon, this mother will start to blame others for her child’s problem and then will end up screaming at the soccer coach on the sidelines for not playing her son who clearly, in her mind, deserves more field time.

The other day a friend commented on Facebook that there were parents at her son’s hockey game who were cheering on their kids’ aggressive behavior against the other team. They’re eight. Competition is great and winning and losing are important lessons but so are sportsmanship, winning well, and accepting loss gracefully. Attachment Parenting (done wrong or taken to the extreme) stands to decrease the ability of children to feel empathy for others because of the intense focus the people in their lives have had on them and their self-esteem. The rudeness of today’s tots has not gone unnoticed, as MSNBC reports:

Many experts say today’s kids are ruder than ever. And it may have something to do with popular parenting movements focusing on self-esteem and the generation that’s embracing them: Generation X, or those born between 1965 and 1977. .. their kids are, well, rude. It may be that today’s parents are so fixated on their children’s emotional well-being that they’re teaching them that the well-being of others is comparatively unimportant

In Waiting for Superman, a documentary on America’s failing schools, statistics detailing the dismal academic scores of our children flash across the screen. While trailing the world in test scores American kids are number one in the world in one area: self-confidence.

Click here to view the 67 legacy comments

Comments are closed.