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Jim Crow Prowls Paradise

May 23rd, 2014 - 8:40 am

Guam has created a racially discriminatory voter roll just like the one in Hawaii and the CNMI. In Guam, you are only allowed to register to vote if you had an ancestor living on Guam who became an American citizen in 1950. The problem for thousands of American citizens living on Guam in 2014 — nearly everyone on Guam in 1950 was of the Chamorro race. This has created a racially exclusionary voter roll for a plebiscite election populated only by voters with Chamorro bloodlines. And what will be on the ballot in the this plebiscite? Whether or not Guam should break away from the United States. Separatism is driving the desire to create a racially exclusionary electorate on Guam, just like in Hawaii. Along with the Center for Individual Rights and others, I am representing US Air Force Major Dave Davis (Ret.), a white American citizen on Guam who was denied the right to register to vote for the plebiscite.  Dave doesn’t have the right racial bloodlines to vote.

Maj. Dave Davis (Ret.)

Maj. Dave Davis (Ret.)

Dave relentlessly badgered Eric Holder’s Justice Department Voting Section for help.  Predictably, as in the CNMI and Hawaii, Eric Holder offered no help. Holder has other priorities than Mr. Davis. Eric Holder called voter ID the modern version of Jim Crow. So a historical refresher is in order. When it came to voting, Jim Crow created all manner of tricks and traps to block black voters from registering to vote. Jim Crow had close cousins like separate water fountains, restrooms and lunch counters. But in voting, Jim Crow was all about keeping blacks off the registration rolls. In Oklahoma, Mr. Crow said that unless your grandfather was eligible to vote, you couldn’t register to vote without passing a complicated literacy test designed to trap black registrants. You needed the right bloodlines to participate in an election. The Supreme Court struck down that trick in Guinn v. United States. Jim Crow wasn’t about voting laws that applied equally to everyone, like voter ID. Jim Crow wondered who your grandfather was. Jim Crow made sure you couldn’t get registered if your bloodlines weren’t racially correct. Jim Crow is alive and well in paradise. What is happening in Guam, the CNMI and Hawaii bears far more resemblance to Jim Crow than the voter ID laws the Justice Department is spending millions of dollars fighting. When I did my interview with Megyn Kelly in July 2010, I knew that the New Black Panther case wasn’t the only matter where a racialist policy by Holder’s Justice Department left some voters unprotected from racial discrimination. After leaving DOJ, I talked to American patriots like Dave Davis who said he had been begging for DOJ help to break down racially discriminatory barriers to the ballot box, but had received none. The New Black Panther dismissal was the first example of Holder’s racially exclusionary priorities, but it wasn’t the only one. When President Obama boasted that his Justice Department had brought 102 voting rights cases, I knew the numbers were phony. Hans von Spakovsky and I explained in detail how the president’s list was phony. Surely an attorney general committed to protecting the voting rights of all Americans, and not just “my people” or “people of color,” could have found the time to submit even an amicus brief in the CNMI case, at a minimum. The CNMI law itself should have been attacked in court by Holder under 42 U.S.C. 1971(c), a law which allowed Holder to bring the suit instead of the plaintiff. Sadly, the voting rights of CNMI plaintiff John Davis don’t seem to be a priority of Eric Holder. Perhaps cases against the CNMI and Hawaii were never brought because the lawyers who have been hired by Eric Holder share Holder’s priorities. PJ Media’s Every Single One series revealed the ideological homogeneity of the new Voting Section lawyers. The Voting Section lawyer assigned to the CNMI is Elizabeth Westfall. It was her job to monitor election litigation in the CNMI and press to vindicate the voting rights of CNMI citizens who were discriminated against. ws Under Voting Section procedures, Westfall would be the first to identify the plight of John Davis and organize DOJ aid.  This also gives her the ability to deep-six the matter.  John Davis helps pay Westfall’s salary, and John Davis deserved protection. The Every Single One series described her background:

According to the Federal Election Commission website, she contributed nearly $7,000 to Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential election campaign, contributed another $4,400 to Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign, contributed $2,000 to Wesley Clark’s presidential campaign in 2004, contributed $3,000 to John Kerry’s presidential campaign and compliance fund in 2004, contributed $500 to former Senate Democratic Majority Leader Tom Daschle’s PAC in 2004, and contributed $2,000 to Hillary Clinton’s U.S. Senate campaign in 2000. In addition to this incredible funding of Democratic candidates, Westfall worked for six years at the far-left Advancement Project, directing its Voter Protection Program and managing its litigation and advocacy activities. She also previously served as a staff attorney at the Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights in its Fair Housing Group, and worked on the Hill as a legislative assistant to then-Congressman Bill Richardson (D-NM). On Westfall’s self-drafted Harvard alumni biography, she notes that she has testified before the U.S. Congress about supposed “barriers” to voter registration, “unwarranted” purging of the voter rolls, and voter caging.

Ironically, instead of fighting the modern version of Jim Crow in the CNMI, Westfall spends her time fighting Texas voter identification laws in court. Or consider the DOJ lawyer assigned to Hawaii, Catherine Meza. Instead of bringing a case to knock down the racially exclusionary Hawaii voter registration roll, Meza is busy attacking North Carolina voter id in court. Her priorities as outlined in the Every Single One series:

Ms. Meza, who contributed $450 to Barack Obama’s presidential campaign before getting hired by the Voting Section, has a rich history of liberal advocacy. During law school at Berkeley, she interned for (i) the NAACP LDF, where she worked on voting rights and “economic justice” issues, (ii) Bay Area Legal Aid, (iii) the ACLU of Northern California, (iv) the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF), (v) Centro Legal de la Raza, and (vi) the East Bay Community Law Center Workers’ Rights Clinic. On her resume, Meza proudly proclaims her membership in the American Constitution Society and her role as an Advisory Board Member of the Thelton Henderson Center for Social Justice. Meanwhile, while working a brief stint at the Fried Frank law firm after law graduation, she assisted on a pro bono case seeking to preserve the confidentiality of ID cards issued to illegal aliens by the city of New Haven, Connecticut, an effort to help illegal aliens avoid being prosecuted for violating federal law. She also helped draft a report for the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination in which she suggested that the U.S. “government’s programs and policies continue to perpetuate segregation and concentrate poverty in communities of color.”

There’s that “of color” thing again. It is no surprise to anyone with walking around sense that civil rights no longer means what it used to mean. The moral victories of the civil rights movement have been squandered by people like Eric Holder and Catherine Meza. In the 1960s, civil rights meant the government would stop using race to provide benefits and impose barriers. Today, the civil rights industry is usually about using race to provide benefits and impose barriers. That Holder’s version of justice doesn’t include some Americans living in Guam, the CNMI and Hawaii should surprise nobody after six years of the Obama presidency. These racially exclusionary efforts are explicit attempts to diminish American sovereignty. The advocates don’t expect it to happen overnight. But like the Chinese proverb that says “three feet of ice is not formed in a single day,” efforts to divide Guam, the CNMI and Hawaii between natives and the American “colonizer” are long-term efforts. Over 8,000 sailors, soldiers and Marines died on these islands in the 20th century. They bore the battle and allowed American ideals of constitutional equality to extend westward. They also secured the most important deep water ports in the Pacific and strategically essential airfields from which I watched American F-22 Raptors land alongside Japanese F-2s. That separatists are using the tricks of Jim Crow to erode the political order in the Pacific while Holder sits silent is a dangerous disgrace.

An F-22 Raptor on the flight line at Andersen Air Force Base Guam (photo by author).

An F-22 Raptor on the flight line at Andersen Air Force Base Guam (photo by author).

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Top Rated Comments   
I wonder how an independent Guam will feel when China drops by for a visit.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
Judeo-Christian, heterosexual, white, males...uncheck your privilege(s).

If you can't trace your heritage back 250 years on these Islands, you can't vote as a citizen.

On the mainland, you can crash the border at will, be a violent criminal...and get better healthcare than our brave servicemen.

Obama, Holder and the Woodstock Traitors Party have their priorities.

How about you, bitter clinger?
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
With the Obama era, it has never been about equality. It is all about revenge.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (62)
All Comments   (62)
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The Guamanians and Hawaiians and PRs are the Island Palestinians. All they are interested in is guilt, power and money for the elite. To teach them a lesson, we should send them a few - no, make that thousands - of liberal Jews.
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
Interesting. You might be interested in this. aug 23, 2011.

(Reuters) - "The nation's second-largest Indian tribe formally booted from membership thousands of descendants of black slaves who were brought to Oklahoma more than 170 years ago by Native American [ slave] owners.
The Cherokee nation voted after the Civil War to admit the slave descendants to the tribe.
But on Monday, the Cherokee nation Supreme Court ruled that a 2007 tribal decision to kick the so-called "Freedmen" out of the tribe was proper."
So basically those former slaves and now former indians are no longer entitled to free health care nor are they exempt from the Obamacare individual mandate.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
As far as I'm concerned, and I have been to Hawaii, Guam and the CNMI island of Saipan, the best thing we could do is expel them from the United States.

Let them all secede, and in a few short years they will once again be practicing cannibalism on their island "paradises".

Or they will be kowtowing to their Chinese and Japanese masters and wishing that the Yankees had never left.

Hafa Adai and get lost!
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
As a 37-year Guam resident I can assure you that you're more likely to be hit by lightening than to come in involuntary contact with a snake of any kind. In the past several years -- in my rural, jungle verge area, I've seen only the occasional one as roadkill on our 4 and 6 lane highways. Dis-and-miss-information is the province of those who browse the wrong magazines. Be advised that the loudest voices in protest against the American colonizer who, incidentally, pumped $2.4 billion (yes, with a B) into Guam's economy in 2012 are the young progressives who left to attend institutions of higher (?) learning like UCLA, U of H and the like and returned after realizing the full political import of victimhood. A few of the older folks continue to agitate for return of "ancestral lands" taken under emminent domain during wartime or bought outright by the feds, all of which have been paid for at least twice. When they do get it back they typically immediately peddle it to Korean or Chinese developers for millions and retire to California. This latest development in the CNMI makes it more likely that I will, indeed, be allowed to register and vote for Guam's political status should it ever become an issue. The eight hundred pound gorilla in the room is the block of 50,000 ethnic Filipinos similarly situated, and that's what terrifies the Chamorros.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
So the holder DOJ claims to fight racial discrimination by encouraging voting laws that restrict your vote based on who your grandfather was. This can only remotely make sense to a leftist.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
Identity is the rule of law in America today, not principle. Right identity equals right. This is because of a cult of sheer race and gender hatred being miserably and pathetically passed off as anti-sexism and anti-racism. Using that latter as cover, they have been incredibly successful in maintaining and mainstreaming a credibility and reasonableness completely at odds with their actual goals. Being fanatics doesn't hurt.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
"The same movement to allocate political power to only people of color in the CNMI is alive and well in Hawaii."

When you use terms like "people of color" you validate the notion that people are different because of their skin color, and in particular the notion that everyone who is not "white" falls under a different classification than people who are "white."

In other words, the left uses this phrase as a way to lump various ethnic and racial groups together into one group that is then cast as being at odds with "white" people.

The words we use matter. When we use the language of the enemy as the enemy does, we help the enemy. These terms should be used only in a manner that undermines their legitimacy and the legitimacy of the ideas they represent.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
Gee, I wish I could tour the Pacific. But I refuse to apply for a Passport, a racist, Jim Crow, poll-tax photoID if there ever was one.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
Actually if you restrict your tour to US pacific states or territories, you would not need a passport, since you never leave US controlled territory, so your comment does not make a lot of sense in connection with voting rights in US states and territories, the subject of this article.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
Hawaii is more complex but Guam is a territory whose only economic activity is a) working for the Government (US or otherwise), b) working for hotels catering to Japanese tourists, c) sex workers catering to Japanese tourists and some US Military. If you grew up in Guam today, what would you think of the US and your opportunities? Chamorro's are the original indigent Malayo-Polynesian culture but the indigent culture was a conquered country by 1668 by the Spanish, then the US took over after the Spanish American war and who banned teaching Chamorro on the island in 1922 and even burnt all Chamorro dictionaries predating the Nazi's in their book burning efforts, then the Japanese in WW2 and back to the US post WW2. If you look at the history of Guam, it is a wonder that any Guamanian should be sane and not tainted by the curse of Jim Crow. And to add to their troubles are the brown tree snake which found its way to Guam probably from the Solomon Islands thanks to WW2 traffic and follow-on transits by military ships and aircraft and has exploded in population while wiping out many bird and lizard species unique to Guam. Nothing gives one the willies like having a brown tree snake suddenly drop on your head, neck, and back.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
Why do I think the history of Guam extends back before 1668? Or was there a Guamanian Empire taking in all of Asia at one point?
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'm not sure your spell checker meant "indigent" rather of indigenous, but somehow it works in the refined progressive Jim Crow context where progressives have managed to convince indigenous people that segregation is a good thing.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
Thanks monkeyfan. A Freudian slip of the keyboard. Apt as you point out but not intentional, with apologies.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
Coming from a city where voter fraud was a tradition in the 1930's, (Kansas City, MO), I have ALWAYS made it my self imposed "duty" to voluntarily show my picture I.D. to the poll worker who checks me off the list when I go vote. It ALWAYS goes like this: [Me], "here's my I.D., so you know it's me voting under my name". [Poll worker], "you don't have to show me an I.D.". [Me], "yes I do". [Poll worker], "it's not required by law". [Me], "it's required by me & clearly my standards are higher than those of the law". [SIGH]...I WISH it didn't ALWAYS have to be like this, but it does!! .
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
So John Davis won on 6 of his 8 complaints The Clerk is directed to enter judgment for Plaintiff on the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and seventh claims for relief, and for Defendants on the sixth and eighth claims for relief. The case remains open, pending disposition of Plaintiff’s request for fees and costs. SO ORDERED this 20th day of May, 2014.

But the deal is he should have gotten help from the DOJ, which should have been on top of this from Day One or at least helped or filed a friend brief (not a lawyer- terminology may be off).

What he got was

crickets.

The Guam thing (another Davis ... something in the genes?) and the Hawaii independence movement does seem like stacking the deck. I wonder what would happen if voting on the mainland was restricted on certain issues to native Americans, or people with ancestors who were here before, say, 1778.
26 weeks ago
26 weeks ago Link To Comment
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