July 30, 2012

JOHN HINDERAKER: The most striking thing about Mitt Romney’s overseas trip has been the press coverage. “It has been hypercritical, to put it mildly. It started in England, where Romney’s observation that certain logistical issues relating to the Olympic Games were ‘disconcerting’–a judgment that has since proved resoundingly correct–was treated as a major diplomatic faux pas. . . . Then it was on to Israel, where Romney’s visit can fairly be characterized as triumphant. Without criticizing President Obama, he made it clear, in a ringing speech in Jerusalem, that his administration would be far friendlier to Israel than Obama’s. Romney’s speech was widely hailed in Israel as well as in the U.S., and probably enhanced his standing with many American Jews. Not to mention the fact that he raised $1 million from contributors with whom he met the next day. And yet press coverage has focused mainly on the Palestinian reaction to Romney’s pointing out that Israel’s “culture” has much to do with its prosperity relative to its neighbors, much as America’s culture explains its economic advantages over Mexico. The Palestinian objection was silly, and here is a news flash for American media: Romney isn’t angling for the Palestinian-American vote. Romney’s visit to Poland has been successful, too.”

You think the press is hypercritical now? Just wait until Romney is President. They’ll make up for their nonstop adulation of Obama by suddenly rediscovering the role of the press as watchdog. But increasingly, people are tuning them out.