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Ed Driscoll

A for Agitprop

March 7th, 2014 - 8:01 am

The film’s third act begins with Natalie Portman being kidnapped and placed into one of these camps. Her everyday prole clothes are replaced with an orange prison dress, and while in solitary confinement, reads a letter from a lesbian who previously occupied the cell, until being executed.

So let’s review: after the 1984 allusion, we see a British concentration camp where the prisoners are dressed in orange Guantanamo bay prison togs. Gitmo as Auschwitz? Muslims and gays as the new Jews? Tony Blair as Hitler? This film doesn’t redline the Godwin meter, it goes off the scale.

However, it turns out that it was all a bit playacting by V to illustrate to Portman what he had previously gone through. Naturally, she loves him even more for having done so, in a classic case of Stockholm Syndrome.

The film climaxes with V destroying Big Ben and the London Parliament, because, as he tells Portman, blowing up a building can be a truly revolutionary statement. Gee, thanks Wachowski brothers, for the apologia for both 9/11 and Bill Ayers’ bombing of the Pentagon.

The method that V uses to place the bombs that cause the destruction is abandoned subway car — and in a macabre bit of synchronicity, while the film was still in production, the 7/7 bombing occurred in the London tube, which this film both anticipated and served as an apology for.

Oh and by the way, V for Vendetta was produced and distributed by Warner Brothers, which since the 1970s, has been a cog in what is now the Time-Warner-CNN-HBO conglomerate. Funny how, during the left’s freakout over Sarah Palin’s clip art in January of 2011, questions about the murderous content of this film was never questioned.

At least on the Blu-Ray disc of V for Vendetta, the Warner Brothers fanfare opening the film was an orchestral version of the classic “As Time Goes By” from Warner Brother’s epochal Casablanca from 1942.

As recounted early on in Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, Peter Biskend’s look at the new Hollywood of the late ‘60s and pre-Star Wars ‘70s, there’s a legendary story about Warren Beatty getting on his hands and knees to convince Jack Warner to fund his version of Bonnie & Clyde. Warner did so, but hated it when the finished product was screened for him. As Rick Perlstein, the leftwing author of Nixonland told Reason magazine in 2008:

My theory is that Bonnie and Clyde was the most important text of the New Left, much more important than anything written by Paul Goodman or C. Wright Mills or Regis Debray. It made an argument about vitality and virtue vs. staidness and morality that was completely new, that resonated with young people in a way that made no sense to old people. Just the idea that the outlaws were the good guys and the bourgeois householders were the bad guys—you cannot underestimate how strange and fresh that was.

Flash-forward from 1967 to 2006, and it’s obvious that the morals of the studio that produced Casablanca have long since rotted away; V for Vendetta is the pathetic end result of result 40 years of cultural decay. It makes for a horrible night at the movies (or home theater), but as an insight into the insanity that the left was capable of when raging cases of Bush Derangement Syndrome rolled the land), it’s a curious time capsule.

Good thing the Obama administration learned so much from the period. Say, when’s Gitmo closing?

Oh, and by the way, having adopted the wearing of Guy Fawkes masks after attending plenty of midnight showings of V, is the seemingly anti-corporate Occupy crowd aware that each mask they buy puts royalties into Time-Warner-CNN-HBO’s coffers, and is molded by minimum wage assembly line workers in a third world country.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to make a few spicy chicken tacos, invite my friends over of an atrocity viewing party, and put on Schinder’s List.

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My condolences, Ed. I found 'V' a bit of a mess as well, though didn't loath it quite as much (Stephen Fry was pretty good as always, even as a gay Muslim apologist). I do find it hilarious that the Occupy crowd (among others) dig that Guy Fawkes getup; I wonder how many of them know they're celebrating a staunch Catholic executed for his religious beliefs?

And I haven't read Podhoretz's snigger at 'Atlas' (seems something anti-Rand has been in the water at NR for decades), but I wonder how he got the idea that Dagny Taggart is a "beautiful, and skinny chick". Believe it or not, there's no physical description of her (nor actually, of any of the heroes beyond hair and eye color) in the book.
37 weeks ago
37 weeks ago Link To Comment
While conservative filmmakers are perfectly capable of producing bad polemics, the big-budget bad polemic is still exclusively a property of the left, whether it's V, "The Day After Tomorrow" or any of the anti-Iraq war movies churned out roughly every six weeks by the studios between 2005 and the start of 2009. And their failures rarely do permanent damage to the careers of their creators, unless the budget gets so big it ends up threatening the future of the studio, as with "Heaven's Gate", Michael Cimino's anti-American screed 33 years ago that sank United Artists.
37 weeks ago
37 weeks ago Link To Comment
It's been so many years. Now review The Maltese Falcon.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
Also factor in that the comic book author of the 1982-1989 original graphic novel, Alan Moore, had Maggie Thatcher Derangement Syndrome about as bad as his American counterpart Michael Moore had Bush Derangement Syndrome. Alan Moore's 1980s V for Vendetta story was his "Fahrenheit 911" against PM Thatcher. (And tangentially, against Reagan.)

Apple. Tree. Fall from.
38 weeks ago
38 weeks ago Link To Comment
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