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Dr. Helen

I am in LA today listening live to PJTV correspondents Michelle Fields and John Phillips at a conference for women entrepreneurs. There were six young women in the Millennial generation discussing how they became their own boss and started a business helping others and getting out of “corporate America.” Their advice: Get together with other women! Network with other females.The first guest Marissa Vicario started part time while working full time. Her main challenge? “I didn’t believe in myself.” Would a man say this? I don’t think so. Why do women–even at an event supported by a right-leaning site like PJ have such doubts? Is it the media? Is there almost a plea for help in their lack of self-confidence? Help me? I am a girl? Is it a marketing tool? It seems to be the latter for business women. If you act in a very feminine way and only help women, you can succeed in today’s female focused society.

Along with the entrepreneurs, there was expert advice and discussion from various people such as: There are more resources for entrepreneurs than ever before. Your expertise is necessary, you need something that you know. Social media is important to getting a customer base. People are starting life-style businesses. Businesses by men are dropping, women’s are going up.

Expert: Hot businesses are great products and lifestyle. What do women care about? Food products or mommy blogging and fashion.

Next up: Brittney Castro, CEO & Founder of Financially Wise Women: “I tried to pretend to be a man. I am more loving and fun and trusted that if I was myself in business, it would work out. We all crave that connection.”

John Phillips: How hard is it to walk into the room and be the only girl? Really? Where is the conference for guys who walk into their local college and are in the minority? Men are the minority in this country in many ways but we only focus on women’s experiences. We don’t care how men feel.

Brittney: “I serve women just like me! I don’t want to be a slave to my business! Be flexible. ….” Imagine if a man said he wanted to serve men and not be a slave to his work–he would probably be branded as sexist and lazy.

Finally, out came Nadia Dorsey who discussed mentors and who seemed very together and to understand how hard it is to have your own businesses. Then a couple of other entrepreneurs with very good advice for their audience.

All in all, a good conference for women but I couldn’t help but wonder when the Next Generation conference for young men on how to navigate college, build their business or learn about their limited reproductive rights would be held. I hope soon!

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All Comments   (7)
All Comments   (7)
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If a group of businessmen urged their colleagues to only do business with men -- or even prefer male partners in their enterprises -- it would be considered a profoundly sexist statement. Your points about young male entrepreneurs is well-taken. And while it is true that women are starting more and more businesses these days, it's also true that women's businesses not only fail at the same rate or slightly more than male small businesses, and that growth of these businesses tends to be stagnant.

I'm not against women in business at all . . . but if they want to compete, then they had best put on their big-girl panties and be ready to compete. A male friend of mine who runs an employment search firm loves to warmly welcome new female business competitors when they appear, and one of the first things he does is listen very carefully to what they say. If they ever bring up "fairness" or "what I deserve", he knows that they aren't going to be around for longer than 18 months. So he raids their best people, undercuts their rates with their best clients, and makes a special point of stirring up problems with them, because he knows that the first time they go to a client and talk about what is "fair", they will lose that client.

Business isn't about fair. It's not about equality. It's about competition and money. And if you aren't willing to get in there and fight, then all the feel-good workshops in the world aren't going to help. What these women are doing is handicapping themselves by focusing on other women instead of being focused on the ever-changing marketplace. You can look at it any other way you like, but you'll be rationalizing the experience.
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
When taking my MBA I specialized in Entrepreneurship.
An entrepreneur is a specific and well defined personality type. Not all business starters are entrepreneurs, but all have one somewhere nearby.

Most, even today, women started/ owned businesses have several built in advantages. These advantages begin with special treatment at banks needing to tick off their Minority Lending boxes to a husband, significant other, father etc. who provides some or all living expenses while Ms. Entrepreneur spends 100% of her time (A key trait of both male and female business starters) and 100% of her revenue, not encumbered by paying rent, feeding the family, car payments etc. toward the early days of struggle.

Men almost never get those advantages.

Especially WEMPs.
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
I think women are more herd oriented. Witness when at a restaurant with multiple women, one women has to go to the loo, so she takes 2 or 3 of her buddies. Men don't do this.
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
HAH! If you want to see something awful, watch a table full of women split a check! Count how many definitions of "Fair" you see.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
-- “I didn’t believe in myself.” Would a man say this? I don’t think so. --

Sure, lots of men would say that. Or more likely think it, because if a man says that, he's automatically beta-fodder with regard to women.

There's a whiff of hypergamy here in that you may only see rich, successful men as men, the others are just extras in the world. To make a comment like that, you likely don't even realize your view of the world and men.
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'd definitely give Helen the benefit of the doubt, not because she's a woman and not because I'm a White Knight, but because her overall attitude is mostly of having a better understanding of men than most women and many men. Everyone can phrase something in a way that can be critiqued at times.

I had to "fake it til I made it" and had lots of self-doubt. I'm now at least firmly entrenched in the middle class, LOL, as a patent attorney and small business owner. Now I get to watch most women's hypergamy and willingness to take a shortcut to money - I would now be a good landing place until they're ready to go for a really rich guy.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Palto,

I understand that many men think this to themselves but as you point out, they don't say it. I think men instinctively (or maybe because of societal pressure? ) understand that you "fake it til you make it" whereas women don't often understand that this is needed in a business setting to succeed.
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
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