I am in LA today listening live to PJTV correspondents Michelle Fields and John Phillips at a conference for women entrepreneurs. There were six young women in the Millennial generation discussing how they became their own boss and started a business helping others and getting out of “corporate America.” Their advice: Get together with other women! Network with other females.The first guest Marissa Vicario started part time while working full time. Her main challenge? “I didn’t believe in myself.” Would a man say this? I don’t think so. Why do women–even at an event supported by a right-leaning site like PJ have such doubts? Is it the media? Is there almost a plea for help in their lack of self-confidence? Help me? I am a girl? Is it a marketing tool? It seems to be the latter for business women. If you act in a very feminine way and only help women, you can succeed in today’s female focused society.

Along with the entrepreneurs, there was expert advice and discussion from various people such as: There are more resources for entrepreneurs than ever before. Your expertise is necessary, you need something that you know. Social media is important to getting a customer base. People are starting life-style businesses. Businesses by men are dropping, women’s are going up.

Expert: Hot businesses are great products and lifestyle. What do women care about? Food products or mommy blogging and fashion.

Next up: Brittney Castro, CEO & Founder of Financially Wise Women: “I tried to pretend to be a man. I am more loving and fun and trusted that if I was myself in business, it would work out. We all crave that connection.”

John Phillips: How hard is it to walk into the room and be the only girl? Really? Where is the conference for guys who walk into their local college and are in the minority? Men are the minority in this country in many ways but we only focus on women’s experiences. We don’t care how men feel.

Brittney: “I serve women just like me! I don’t want to be a slave to my business! Be flexible. ….” Imagine if a man said he wanted to serve men and not be a slave to his work–he would probably be branded as sexist and lazy.

Finally, out came Nadia Dorsey who discussed mentors and who seemed very together and to understand how hard it is to have your own businesses. Then a couple of other entrepreneurs with very good advice for their audience.

All in all, a good conference for women but I couldn’t help but wonder when the Next Generation conference for young men on how to navigate college, build their business or learn about their limited reproductive rights would be held. I hope soon!